2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162713
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Department (ED) Nurses' Care of Patients in Pain
Abstract:
Emergency Department (ED) Nurses' Care of Patients in Pain
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2001
Author:Puntillo, Kathleen, RN, DNSc, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Department of Physiological Nursing
Contact Address:2 Koret Street, Box 0610 UCSF, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
Contact Telephone:(415) 476-1844
Co-Authors:Martha Neighbor, MD; Nel O'Neil, RN, MS; Linda Couts, RN, MS, ACNP; Garrett Chan, RN, MS, CS; and Lisa Boulais, RN, MS
Purpose: Many patients present to the ED with moderate to severe pain. This study described ED RNs' pain assessment techniques, their communication with MDs about patient pain needs, and their concordance with patients' degree of pain intensity and pain relief. Design: This was a prospective, descriptive study. Setting: This study was conducted in two Level I Trauma Center EDs. Sample: Data were collected from adult patients and their RNs if the patient presented with abdominal (n=61), abscess (n=41), chronic (n=39), and trauma-related pain (n=37). There were 69 RNs (Mean age = 38.4, SD=8.7 years) primarily female (n-52), white (n=54), and experienced (M=9.4 years, SD=7.4 years in Ed nursing). There were 180 patients (Mean age = 41.3, SD=12.5 years) mostly male (n=107), and white (n=92). Informed consent was obtained from the patients and RNs. Methodology: Surveys were developed and validated for this study. Pain scores were rated on a 0 - 10 numerical rating scale (NRS). RNs and patients were interviewed after the initial pain assessment and before patient discharge. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There were 180 RN/patient dyads. There was a significant difference (t=9.3; p<.001) in estimated patient pain intensity at admission between RNs and patients (M=5.5 vs. 7.3). Abdominal pain patients reported the highest pain (M=7.7; SD=2.0); trauma patients the lowest pain (M=6.4; SD=2.7). RNs rated the highest pain to abdominal pain patients (M=6.3; SD=2.6) and the lowest to chronic pain patients (M=4.2; SD=2.5). To assess patient pain, RNs used questioning (31.4%); observed behaviors (26.1%); patient report (15.7%); or used several assessment methods (19%). After their initial assessment, 40.3% of RNs approached the patient?s MD/NP for a pain medication order. There was no significant difference (t= -1.4; p>.05) in the amount of pain relief reported by the patients (M=5.3; SD=3.2) and the effectiveness of pain treatment reported by RNs (M=5.8; SD=3.4). Conclusions: Discrepancies exist between RNs and their patients in quantification of patient pain. RNs use a number of pain assessment techniques, but many did not ask patients about their pain. The majority of RNs did not seek a pain medication order after their initial assessment. RNs and patients agree on the degree of pain treatment effectiveness; however, the perceived efficacy is moderate at best. This study identified factors to be explored in improving ED patient pain assessment and treatment outcomes. Acknowledgements: This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute for Nursing Research #1R55NR04451-01A2. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Describe the ED nurse's pain assessment techniques;
2) Recall the ED nurse's communication with physicians about patient needs; and 3) State the ED nurse?s concordance with patients regarding degrees of pain intensity and pain relief. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department (ED) Nurses' Care of Patients in Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162713-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Department (ED) Nurses' Care of Patients in Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Puntillo, Kathleen, RN, DNSc, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco<br/>Department of Physiological Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Street, Box 0610 UCSF, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(415) 476-1844</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathleen_puntillo@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Martha Neighbor, MD; Nel O'Neil, RN, MS; Linda Couts, RN, MS, ACNP; Garrett Chan, RN, MS, CS; and Lisa Boulais, RN, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Many patients present to the ED with moderate to severe pain. This study described ED RNs' pain assessment techniques, their communication with MDs about patient pain needs, and their concordance with patients' degree of pain intensity and pain relief. Design: This was a prospective, descriptive study. Setting: This study was conducted in two Level I Trauma Center EDs. Sample: Data were collected from adult patients and their RNs if the patient presented with abdominal (n=61), abscess (n=41), chronic (n=39), and trauma-related pain (n=37). There were 69 RNs (Mean age = 38.4, SD=8.7 years) primarily female (n-52), white (n=54), and experienced (M=9.4 years, SD=7.4 years in Ed nursing). There were 180 patients (Mean age = 41.3, SD=12.5 years) mostly male (n=107), and white (n=92). Informed consent was obtained from the patients and RNs. Methodology: Surveys were developed and validated for this study. Pain scores were rated on a 0 - 10 numerical rating scale (NRS). RNs and patients were interviewed after the initial pain assessment and before patient discharge. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There were 180 RN/patient dyads. There was a significant difference (t=9.3; p&lt;.001) in estimated patient pain intensity at admission between RNs and patients (M=5.5 vs. 7.3). Abdominal pain patients reported the highest pain (M=7.7; SD=2.0); trauma patients the lowest pain (M=6.4; SD=2.7). RNs rated the highest pain to abdominal pain patients (M=6.3; SD=2.6) and the lowest to chronic pain patients (M=4.2; SD=2.5). To assess patient pain, RNs used questioning (31.4%); observed behaviors (26.1%); patient report (15.7%); or used several assessment methods (19%). After their initial assessment, 40.3% of RNs approached the patient?s MD/NP for a pain medication order. There was no significant difference (t= -1.4; p&gt;.05) in the amount of pain relief reported by the patients (M=5.3; SD=3.2) and the effectiveness of pain treatment reported by RNs (M=5.8; SD=3.4). Conclusions: Discrepancies exist between RNs and their patients in quantification of patient pain. RNs use a number of pain assessment techniques, but many did not ask patients about their pain. The majority of RNs did not seek a pain medication order after their initial assessment. RNs and patients agree on the degree of pain treatment effectiveness; however, the perceived efficacy is moderate at best. This study identified factors to be explored in improving ED patient pain assessment and treatment outcomes. Acknowledgements: This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute for Nursing Research #1R55NR04451-01A2. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Describe the ED nurse's pain assessment techniques;<br/>2) Recall the ED nurse's communication with physicians about patient needs; and 3) State the ED nurse?s concordance with patients regarding degrees of pain intensity and pain relief. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.