2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162719
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Child Maltreatment Awareness for Pre-hospital Providers
Abstract:
Child Maltreatment Awareness for Pre-hospital Providers
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2001
Author:Weintraub, Barbara, RN, MPH, MSN, PCCNP
P.I. Institution Name:Northwest Community Hospital, Children's Memorial Hospital
Contact Address:800 W. Central, Arlington Heights, IL, 60005, USA
Contact Telephone:(847) 618-5432
Co-Authors:Elisabeth Weber, RN, MA; Peter Lazzara, BS, NREMT-P; Elisabeth Froemel, LCSW; Dana Wiltsek, LCSW; and Susan Fuchs, MD
Purpose: Despite advances made in detection of child abuse, many cases continue to go undetected. Emergency personnel are in unique positions to assess this problem, particularly in the pre-hospital setting. Assessment of child abuse can be included in education programs for emergency personnel. We hypothesize that child maltreatment education will increase awareness of maltreatment assessment, laws and reporting by pre-hospital care providers. Design: Quasi-experimental pre-/post-test design. Setting: A large urban EMS/fire department. Sample: The sample consisted of emergency personnel scheduled for continuing education. Mean years of experience was 10.3 years (SD=8.5). Consent was obtained prior to participation. Methodology: A multidisciplinary focus group of paramedics, educators, ED nurses, physicians, and social workers developed slides, speaker's notes, and reference cards for the education program. Tool validity was ascertained via use of a sample group. The confidential 10-question true/false test was given pre- and post-lecture, which focused on job-related experience with child abuse recognition and reporting. Lectures were delivered by one of the four focus group members, all of whom had encountered previous child abuse cases. Results: A total of 368 of 416 tests were properly completed. Over one-half (n-251) were EMT-B's (mean years of experience=3.6, SD=5.4), 117 were EMT-P's (mean year of experience=12.16, SD=8). There was no statistical difference between paramedics and EMT-Bs either pre-or post-lecture. Mean pre-test versus post-test scores were 7.78 vs. 8.51 (p<0.001). The greatest improvement involved abuse definitions and reporting requirements. Eight of 10 questions showed improvement in correct answers. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary education program helped to increase awareness of child maltreatment laws, assessment, and reporting among this group of pre-hospital providers. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Identify barriers to recognition of child abuse in the pre-hospital environment; 2) Identify obstacles in reporting child abuse in the pre-hospital environment; and 3) Recognize interventions which can overcome barriers to reporting and recognition of child abuse. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChild Maltreatment Awareness for Pre-hospital Providersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162719-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Child Maltreatment Awareness for Pre-hospital Providers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weintraub, Barbara, RN, MPH, MSN, PCCNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwest Community Hospital, Children's Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">800 W. Central, Arlington Heights, IL, 60005, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(847) 618-5432</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbrn@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elisabeth Weber, RN, MA; Peter Lazzara, BS, NREMT-P; Elisabeth Froemel, LCSW; Dana Wiltsek, LCSW; and Susan Fuchs, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Despite advances made in detection of child abuse, many cases continue to go undetected. Emergency personnel are in unique positions to assess this problem, particularly in the pre-hospital setting. Assessment of child abuse can be included in education programs for emergency personnel. We hypothesize that child maltreatment education will increase awareness of maltreatment assessment, laws and reporting by pre-hospital care providers. Design: Quasi-experimental pre-/post-test design. Setting: A large urban EMS/fire department. Sample: The sample consisted of emergency personnel scheduled for continuing education. Mean years of experience was 10.3 years (SD=8.5). Consent was obtained prior to participation. Methodology: A multidisciplinary focus group of paramedics, educators, ED nurses, physicians, and social workers developed slides, speaker's notes, and reference cards for the education program. Tool validity was ascertained via use of a sample group. The confidential 10-question true/false test was given pre- and post-lecture, which focused on job-related experience with child abuse recognition and reporting. Lectures were delivered by one of the four focus group members, all of whom had encountered previous child abuse cases. Results: A total of 368 of 416 tests were properly completed. Over one-half (n-251) were EMT-B's (mean years of experience=3.6, SD=5.4), 117 were EMT-P's (mean year of experience=12.16, SD=8). There was no statistical difference between paramedics and EMT-Bs either pre-or post-lecture. Mean pre-test versus post-test scores were 7.78 vs. 8.51 (p&lt;0.001). The greatest improvement involved abuse definitions and reporting requirements. Eight of 10 questions showed improvement in correct answers. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary education program helped to increase awareness of child maltreatment laws, assessment, and reporting among this group of pre-hospital providers. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Identify barriers to recognition of child abuse in the pre-hospital environment; 2) Identify obstacles in reporting child abuse in the pre-hospital environment; and 3) Recognize interventions which can overcome barriers to reporting and recognition of child abuse. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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