2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162723
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Emergency Department Waiting Room Study: Improving the Experience
Abstract:
An Emergency Department Waiting Room Study: Improving the Experience
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Delpais, Paul, RN CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network
Title:Patient Care Coordinator û Emergency Department, Cedar Crest
Contact Address:1200 S. Cedar Crest Blvd., Allentown, PA, 18103, USA
Contact Telephone:(610) 402-8747
Co-Authors: Andrew Martin RN, PHRN; Anne Panik RN, MS, CNAA; Joanna Bokovoy RN, DrPH; Elizabeth Karoly RRT, MBA; Kim Badillo RN, BA, MA; Charlotte Buckenmyer RN, MS, CEN; Courtney Vose RN, MSN, CRNP, CEN; and Gina Sierzega BA, MA
Purpose: As many hospital admissions arrive via the emergency department (ED), the ED waiting room is often a place of first impressions for patients, family members, and visitors. Thus, a portion of patient satisfaction scores is attributable to the patient's waiting room experience. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the waiting room and make improvements as needed.

Design: A pre-post prospective, observational study was conducted over a three-year period to examine patient satisfaction.

Setting: This is emergency department is part of a Magnet, Level I Trauma Center that treats approximately 52,000 patients each year.

Participants: Hospital staff, patients, family members, visitors, and volunteers were included. This study was reviewed by and exempt from full board review by the hospital's Institutional Review Board.

Methods: A study team (led by an ED administrator and a nurse researcher) was convened and charged with identifying ways to improve the waiting room and the waiting room experience. They identified a problem with patient satisfaction in the ED waiting room and implemented a research study using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The study consisted of a pilot study to test data collection tools and validate study surveys and a pre-post study. During each of these two-week data collection phases, the research team conducted observational analysis of the waiting room, distributed patient satisfaction surveys via the ED registration area, and asked ED hospital volunteers to complete specialized satisfaction surveys. Other study team members included ED directors, a clinical information analyst, a patient representative specialist, and a research/grant specialist. The problem was patient, family, and friend complaints included in Press Ganey surveys.

Results: The study team used factor analysis to evaluate the 14 Likert-scale questions on the patient satisfaction survey. Results for the pre-test showed that four factors accounted for 77% of the variance in patient or family responses. The four factors were comfort with environment, neatness and cleanliness, noise, and personal attention. Analysis for the post-test is currently underway. There were 53 pre-test surveys completed by patients and family members. This represented an 82% return rate. Demographics were reported as frequencies, and five-point Likert-scale data were reported as box plots, with satisfaction scores ranging from 3.18 (SD 1.17) to 4.28 (SD .99). Post-test results are currently being analyzed and will be available during the presentation.

Recommendations: The pre-post study demonstrated that careful planning and understanding of observational research methods are necessary to effectively evaluate an environment. The take home message is not to think you know the answers. Post-research findings may surprise you. The environment plays a huge role in patient, family, and friend satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Emergency Department Waiting Room Study: Improving the Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162723-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Emergency Department Waiting Room Study: Improving the Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Delpais, Paul, RN CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Patient Care Coordinator &ucirc; Emergency Department, Cedar Crest</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1200 S. Cedar Crest Blvd., Allentown, PA, 18103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(610) 402-8747</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">paul_a.delpais@lvh.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value"> Andrew Martin RN, PHRN; Anne Panik RN, MS, CNAA; Joanna Bokovoy RN, DrPH; Elizabeth Karoly RRT, MBA; Kim Badillo RN, BA, MA; Charlotte Buckenmyer RN, MS, CEN; Courtney Vose RN, MSN, CRNP, CEN; and Gina Sierzega BA, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: As many hospital admissions arrive via the emergency department (ED), the ED waiting room is often a place of first impressions for patients, family members, and visitors. Thus, a portion of patient satisfaction scores is attributable to the patient's waiting room experience. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the waiting room and make improvements as needed.<br/><br/>Design: A pre-post prospective, observational study was conducted over a three-year period to examine patient satisfaction.<br/><br/>Setting: This is emergency department is part of a Magnet, Level I Trauma Center that treats approximately 52,000 patients each year. <br/><br/>Participants: Hospital staff, patients, family members, visitors, and volunteers were included. This study was reviewed by and exempt from full board review by the hospital's Institutional Review Board.<br/><br/>Methods: A study team (led by an ED administrator and a nurse researcher) was convened and charged with identifying ways to improve the waiting room and the waiting room experience. They identified a problem with patient satisfaction in the ED waiting room and implemented a research study using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The study consisted of a pilot study to test data collection tools and validate study surveys and a pre-post study. During each of these two-week data collection phases, the research team conducted observational analysis of the waiting room, distributed patient satisfaction surveys via the ED registration area, and asked ED hospital volunteers to complete specialized satisfaction surveys. Other study team members included ED directors, a clinical information analyst, a patient representative specialist, and a research/grant specialist. The problem was patient, family, and friend complaints included in Press Ganey surveys. <br/><br/>Results: The study team used factor analysis to evaluate the 14 Likert-scale questions on the patient satisfaction survey. Results for the pre-test showed that four factors accounted for 77% of the variance in patient or family responses. The four factors were comfort with environment, neatness and cleanliness, noise, and personal attention. Analysis for the post-test is currently underway. There were 53 pre-test surveys completed by patients and family members. This represented an 82% return rate. Demographics were reported as frequencies, and five-point Likert-scale data were reported as box plots, with satisfaction scores ranging from 3.18 (SD 1.17) to 4.28 (SD .99). Post-test results are currently being analyzed and will be available during the presentation.<br/><br/>Recommendations: The pre-post study demonstrated that careful planning and understanding of observational research methods are necessary to effectively evaluate an environment. The take home message is not to think you know the answers. Post-research findings may surprise you. The environment plays a huge role in patient, family, and friend satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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