2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162728
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hurricane Katrina: Could Your Facility Weather The Storm?
Abstract:
Hurricane Katrina: Could Your Facility Weather The Storm?
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Smith, Flo, RN, MPH, CEN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Ochsner Clinic Foundation
Title:Unit Director, Emergency Department/Flight Care
Contact Address:1514 Jefferson Hwy., New Orleans, LA, 70121, USA
Contact Telephone:(504) 842-2245
Co-Authors:Nathalie D. Leger RN, MSN
Purpose: On August 29, 2005, the New Orleans region was hit by the worst natural disaster in our country's history - Hurricane Katrina. Health professionals on duty that day will never forget their struggles to keep their patients safe and alive amidst the chaos. Our medical center, located 5 miles west of downtown New Orleans, took a direct hit, but along with only two out of 25 other area facilities, remained functional in the aftermath of the storm. One week post-storm, our CNO formed a disaster management committee, as part of a larger, collaborative effort, to evaluate what we did right and wrong. This paper describes that evaluative process and the lessons we learned to better prepare other healthcare organizations to react in a disaster.

Design: This quality management improvement and staff development project describes the evaluative process of our organization's response to Hurricane Katrina during and after the storm.

Setting: A 39-bed, level 2 emergency department with 60,000 visits annually that remained open before, during and after the storm.

Participants: All employees and systems of our medical center in place during and two weeks post-storm.

Methods: One week post-storm our organization, along with two other functioning facilities, collaborated daily over a period of three months with local, state and federal officials to review the availability of emergency medical services to New Orleans and surrounding areas. Management staff on duty during the hurricane was interviewed regarding disaster response procedures. Various systems and infrastructures were measured for operational effectiveness and for their ability to ensure safety and basic needs to patients, families, employees and visitors. During this period, our CNO formed a disaster management committee, made up of vice presidents or directors of each department, who evaluated the effectiveness of their staff and systems. The committee met weekly for three months. Action plans were developed and progress was reported on a monthly basis until a comprehensive, hospital-wide disaster plan was created.

Results: The evaluation of our facility yielded a number of positive and negative findings. Systems identified as ensuring operational effectiveness included a self-sustaining two-week plan, appropriate location of generators, well water availability, an internal phone system, Internet communication, HEAR radio, National guard to boost security, a tracking system for employees/patients/visitors, curfews, and strong leadership. Systems found lacking included a plan to prioritize patient evacuation, method of transportation, powerless vertical movement, evacuation documentation, and emotional crisis intervention.

Recommendations: No one knows when disaster will strike, especially one as large and lethal as Hurricane Katrina. Healthcare organizations must therefore be prepared to handle catastrophes of every size and kind and must conduct regular updates to ensure continuing disaster preparedness. Strong leadership is critical to help people remain focused and calm. To ensure the best possible outcomes in the event of a disaster, healthcare organizations must have the following systems in place that focus on three distinct phases of a disaster: preparing for the disaster, dealing with the disaster when it strikes, and coping in the aftermath of the disaster.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHurricane Katrina: Could Your Facility Weather The Storm?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162728-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hurricane Katrina: Could Your Facility Weather The Storm?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Flo, RN, MPH, CEN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ochsner Clinic Foundation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Unit Director, Emergency Department/Flight Care</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1514 Jefferson Hwy., New Orleans, LA, 70121, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(504) 842-2245</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fismith@ochsner.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nathalie D. Leger RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: On August 29, 2005, the New Orleans region was hit by the worst natural disaster in our country's history - Hurricane Katrina. Health professionals on duty that day will never forget their struggles to keep their patients safe and alive amidst the chaos. Our medical center, located 5 miles west of downtown New Orleans, took a direct hit, but along with only two out of 25 other area facilities, remained functional in the aftermath of the storm. One week post-storm, our CNO formed a disaster management committee, as part of a larger, collaborative effort, to evaluate what we did right and wrong. This paper describes that evaluative process and the lessons we learned to better prepare other healthcare organizations to react in a disaster.<br/><br/>Design: This quality management improvement and staff development project describes the evaluative process of our organization's response to Hurricane Katrina during and after the storm. <br/><br/>Setting: A 39-bed, level 2 emergency department with 60,000 visits annually that remained open before, during and after the storm.<br/><br/>Participants: All employees and systems of our medical center in place during and two weeks post-storm.<br/><br/>Methods: One week post-storm our organization, along with two other functioning facilities, collaborated daily over a period of three months with local, state and federal officials to review the availability of emergency medical services to New Orleans and surrounding areas. Management staff on duty during the hurricane was interviewed regarding disaster response procedures. Various systems and infrastructures were measured for operational effectiveness and for their ability to ensure safety and basic needs to patients, families, employees and visitors. During this period, our CNO formed a disaster management committee, made up of vice presidents or directors of each department, who evaluated the effectiveness of their staff and systems. The committee met weekly for three months. Action plans were developed and progress was reported on a monthly basis until a comprehensive, hospital-wide disaster plan was created. <br/><br/>Results: The evaluation of our facility yielded a number of positive and negative findings. Systems identified as ensuring operational effectiveness included a self-sustaining two-week plan, appropriate location of generators, well water availability, an internal phone system, Internet communication, HEAR radio, National guard to boost security, a tracking system for employees/patients/visitors, curfews, and strong leadership. Systems found lacking included a plan to prioritize patient evacuation, method of transportation, powerless vertical movement, evacuation documentation, and emotional crisis intervention. <br/><br/>Recommendations: No one knows when disaster will strike, especially one as large and lethal as Hurricane Katrina. Healthcare organizations must therefore be prepared to handle catastrophes of every size and kind and must conduct regular updates to ensure continuing disaster preparedness. Strong leadership is critical to help people remain focused and calm. To ensure the best possible outcomes in the event of a disaster, healthcare organizations must have the following systems in place that focus on three distinct phases of a disaster: preparing for the disaster, dealing with the disaster when it strikes, and coping in the aftermath of the disaster.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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