Emergency Department Violence: Perception of Hospital Administrators and Emergency Department Nurse Managers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Department Violence: Perception of Hospital Administrators and Emergency Department Nurse Managers
Abstract:
Emergency Department Violence: Perception of Hospital Administrators and Emergency Department Nurse Managers
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Ansel, Matthew, RN, MS, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Union Hospital of Cecil County
Contact Address:9327 Perglen Road, Baltimore, MD, 21235, USA
Purpose: Are hospital administrators aware of the effect that an increasingly violent society is having on their emergency departments? Although violence has been present in emergency departments for many years, most emergency departments have not significantly changed their safety or security measures. The purpose of this study is to gather data to determine if there is a significant difference in perception between hospital administrators and emergency department nurse managers on emergency department violence.

Design: A survey with a standard five-point response Likert scale was used in the study.

Setting/Sample: Administrators and nurse managers in an emergency department operating 24 hours a day in Maryland (total=51) were asked to participate. The convenience sample of 40 administrators and 48 nurse managers represented 78% and 94% respectively of the total surveys. The respondents were from diverse emergency department settings throughout Maryland.

Methodology: A pilot study was conducted in Pennsylvania to ensure face validity of the questionnaire. In 1996, the revised questionnaire was sent to all Maryland hospitals. The survey consisted of five demographic questions and thirteen questions related to the perception of violence in their emergency department. A Cronbach coefficient of 0.90 determined the survey's reliability. A ridit analysis was used to determine if there was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in perception of emergency department violence between the hospital administrators and the emergency department nurse managers. The cumulative scores for each group were compared as well as the results of the individual questions.

Results: The overall rid it score for the summated totals of managers versus administrators was statistically significant (p = 0.001), therefore the null hypothesis, that there is no significant difference in perception of emergency department violence, was rejected.

Conclusion: According to the survey results, nurse managers perceive more of a violence problem in their emergency departments. This difference is one possible reason why, although there is a documented violence problem in emergency departments across America, most are still ill-equipped to protect themselves. These results suggest that each hospital complete an assessment of their own needs and share those findings with all relevant departments including administration and security. Proactive measures should be taken to correct any problems identified. An effective reporting mechanism must be developed, if not already in place, so administrators will be aware of the problem. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department Violence: Perception of Hospital Administrators and Emergency Department Nurse Managersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162733-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Department Violence: Perception of Hospital Administrators and Emergency Department Nurse Managers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ansel, Matthew, RN, MS, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Union Hospital of Cecil County</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9327 Perglen Road, Baltimore, MD, 21235, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mansel@home.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Are hospital administrators aware of the effect that an increasingly violent society is having on their emergency departments? Although violence has been present in emergency departments for many years, most emergency departments have not significantly changed their safety or security measures. The purpose of this study is to gather data to determine if there is a significant difference in perception between hospital administrators and emergency department nurse managers on emergency department violence.<br/><br/>Design: A survey with a standard five-point response Likert scale was used in the study.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: Administrators and nurse managers in an emergency department operating 24 hours a day in Maryland (total=51) were asked to participate. The convenience sample of 40 administrators and 48 nurse managers represented 78% and 94% respectively of the total surveys. The respondents were from diverse emergency department settings throughout Maryland.<br/><br/>Methodology: A pilot study was conducted in Pennsylvania to ensure face validity of the questionnaire. In 1996, the revised questionnaire was sent to all Maryland hospitals. The survey consisted of five demographic questions and thirteen questions related to the perception of violence in their emergency department. A Cronbach coefficient of 0.90 determined the survey's reliability. A ridit analysis was used to determine if there was a significant difference (p &lt; 0.05) in perception of emergency department violence between the hospital administrators and the emergency department nurse managers. The cumulative scores for each group were compared as well as the results of the individual questions.<br/><br/>Results: The overall rid it score for the summated totals of managers versus administrators was statistically significant (p = 0.001), therefore the null hypothesis, that there is no significant difference in perception of emergency department violence, was rejected.<br/><br/>Conclusion: According to the survey results, nurse managers perceive more of a violence problem in their emergency departments. This difference is one possible reason why, although there is a documented violence problem in emergency departments across America, most are still ill-equipped to protect themselves. These results suggest that each hospital complete an assessment of their own needs and share those findings with all relevant departments including administration and security. Proactive measures should be taken to correct any problems identified. An effective reporting mechanism must be developed, if not already in place, so administrators will be aware of the problem. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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