2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162734
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Body Art Recipients: Health Provider Attitudes
Abstract:
Body Art Recipients: Health Provider Attitudes
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Armstrong, Myrna L., EdD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Tech University Health Science Center
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3601 4th Street, Lubbock, TX, 79430, USA
Contact Telephone:(806) 743-2730
Body art (tattooing and body piercing) is gaining in popularity among people of all ages, occupations, and social classes. Many will present to the emergency department for treatment. Anecdotal reports suggest that health provider's attitudes towards tattooed persons may be negative.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the attitudes of health providers and medical and nursing students toward various groups of tattooed people, and evaluate differences in attitudes associated with gender or role of the respondent. Relationships between attitudes and demographic characteristics, such as age or having a family member (s) with tattoos were also examined.

Sample/Methods: Health providers in 22 states facilitated data collection for this descriptive correlational, comparative study. A demographic form and the Armstrong Tattoo Scales (ATS) were distributed to a convenience sample of MDs (n = 62, RNs (n = 331), LVN/LPNs (n = 51), and medical and nursing students (n = 157). Each ATS was a semantic differential scale with 16 pairs of bipolar adjectives representing beliefs about persons with tattoos using a seven point Likert Scale. The various groups of tattooed people that were examined were professional men, non-professional men, professional women, non-professional women, and adolescents (13-18 years old). An expert panel of two doctorally prepared faculty and one sociologist was used for content validity and a pilot study of 161 nursing students was used to initially determine construct validity.

Results: Most respondents (89%) reported caring for a yearly average of 80 tattooed people; a quarter had tattooed family members. Cronbach' s alpha of the A TS for the five groups ranged from 0.92 to 0.95. Strong positive correlations (r=0.68 to 0.83, P, 0.001) were found among the ATS scores of the five groups of tattooed persons. Student ratings were significantly more positive towards tattooed people than ratings from RNs and MDs, yet, regardless of the role, tattooed adolescents received the lowest mean ratings. Between genders, female respondents viewed tattooed people less favorable, especially tattooed professional women.

Conclusions: Increasing numbers of persons have body art and are encountered in the emergency department. Efforts need to be made by health providers to identify their attitudes toward tattooed [and body pierced] people in general, and adolescents in particular, and to examine if there is an impact on the care these clients receive. A less positive attitude on the part of the health care provider, especially the adolescent, may have a negative impact on the caring relationships which develop. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBody Art Recipients: Health Provider Attitudesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162734-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Body Art Recipients: Health Provider Attitudes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Armstrong, Myrna L., EdD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Tech University Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3601 4th Street, Lubbock, TX, 79430, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(806) 743-2730</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sonmla@ttuhsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Body art (tattooing and body piercing) is gaining in popularity among people of all ages, occupations, and social classes. Many will present to the emergency department for treatment. Anecdotal reports suggest that health provider's attitudes towards tattooed persons may be negative.<br/><br/>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the attitudes of health providers and medical and nursing students toward various groups of tattooed people, and evaluate differences in attitudes associated with gender or role of the respondent. Relationships between attitudes and demographic characteristics, such as age or having a family member (s) with tattoos were also examined.<br/><br/>Sample/Methods: Health providers in 22 states facilitated data collection for this descriptive correlational, comparative study. A demographic form and the Armstrong Tattoo Scales (ATS) were distributed to a convenience sample of MDs (n = 62, RNs (n = 331), LVN/LPNs (n = 51), and medical and nursing students (n = 157). Each ATS was a semantic differential scale with 16 pairs of bipolar adjectives representing beliefs about persons with tattoos using a seven point Likert Scale. The various groups of tattooed people that were examined were professional men, non-professional men, professional women, non-professional women, and adolescents (13-18 years old). An expert panel of two doctorally prepared faculty and one sociologist was used for content validity and a pilot study of 161 nursing students was used to initially determine construct validity.<br/><br/>Results: Most respondents (89%) reported caring for a yearly average of 80 tattooed people; a quarter had tattooed family members. Cronbach' s alpha of the A TS for the five groups ranged from 0.92 to 0.95. Strong positive correlations (r=0.68 to 0.83, P, 0.001) were found among the ATS scores of the five groups of tattooed persons. Student ratings were significantly more positive towards tattooed people than ratings from RNs and MDs, yet, regardless of the role, tattooed adolescents received the lowest mean ratings. Between genders, female respondents viewed tattooed people less favorable, especially tattooed professional women.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Increasing numbers of persons have body art and are encountered in the emergency department. Efforts need to be made by health providers to identify their attitudes toward tattooed [and body pierced] people in general, and adolescents in particular, and to examine if there is an impact on the care these clients receive. A less positive attitude on the part of the health care provider, especially the adolescent, may have a negative impact on the caring relationships which develop. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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