2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162736
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Playground Injuries in Children: A Review and Trauma Center Experience
Abstract:
Playground Injuries in Children: A Review and Trauma Center Experience
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Bernardo, Lisa Marie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 415 Victoria Building, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA
Contact Telephone:(412) 624-7637
Co-Authors:Mary J. Gardner and Karin Siebel
Purpose: Playgrounds allow children to engage in activities and exercise. Playgrounds can be unsafe, leading to injuries and trauma center admission. This study's purposes were to: 1) describe the demographics and characteristics of children admitted to Pennsylvanian trauma centers for playground injuries; 2) compare these findings with the literature; and 3) recommend strategies to reduce playground-related injuries.

Design/Setting: This retrospective, descriptive study was conducted at a University.

Sample: Patient records in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study for 1989 through 1998 comprised the sample. Inclusion criteria were age (<18 years); site of injury (playground); and E-code.

Methodology: Records were abstracted for age; gender; intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS); discharge status; injury month and time; injury description; Injury Severity Score (ISS) and physical injury.

Results: The sample consisted of 234 patients aged 1 to 18 years, mean=6.6; 74% were age 3 to 9 years. Most were male (n=148, 63%). Forty-six patients (20%) required ICU admission (LOS range=1 to 6 days, mean = 1.7). All were hospitalized (LOS range=1 to 25 days, mean = 3.3). All patients survived. While 227 (97%) were discharged to home, 5 (2.2%) were discharged to other hospitals/trauma centers and 2 (0.8%) went to a rehabilitation facility. Most injuries (77%) occurred from April to September and from noon to 6pm (n=118, 69%). Falls from playground equipment (n=155, 73%) constituted the highest proportion of injury descriptions. Most ISS's were mild to moderate (n=208, 90%). There was a weak correlation between age and ISS (r = -.141, p=.032) and between ISS and ICU LOS (r=.330, p=<.00I). Of 421 injuries (mean=1.8/patient), most were upper extremity (n=117) and head (n=II0).

Conclusions: Playground-related injuries were an infrequent occurrence (234/35,676 or 6.56/1,000) of mild to moderate severity that did not result in fatal injury among children admitted to Pennsylvania trauma centers, with a very small fraction (0.8%) requiring rehabilitation services. Characteristics of these children were similar to published reports. Emergency nurses should be alert for injuries following playground falls and should advocate for protective surfacing, low equipment height and proper adult supervision. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePlayground Injuries in Children: A Review and Trauma Center Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162736-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Playground Injuries in Children: A Review and Trauma Center Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernardo, Lisa Marie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 415 Victoria Building, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(412) 624-7637</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">LBE100+@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary J. Gardner and Karin Siebel</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Playgrounds allow children to engage in activities and exercise. Playgrounds can be unsafe, leading to injuries and trauma center admission. This study's purposes were to: 1) describe the demographics and characteristics of children admitted to Pennsylvanian trauma centers for playground injuries; 2) compare these findings with the literature; and 3) recommend strategies to reduce playground-related injuries.<br/><br/>Design/Setting: This retrospective, descriptive study was conducted at a University.<br/><br/>Sample: Patient records in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study for 1989 through 1998 comprised the sample. Inclusion criteria were age (&lt;18 years); site of injury (playground); and E-code.<br/><br/>Methodology: Records were abstracted for age; gender; intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS); discharge status; injury month and time; injury description; Injury Severity Score (ISS) and physical injury.<br/><br/>Results: The sample consisted of 234 patients aged 1 to 18 years, mean=6.6; 74% were age 3 to 9 years. Most were male (n=148, 63%). Forty-six patients (20%) required ICU admission (LOS range=1 to 6 days, mean = 1.7). All were hospitalized (LOS range=1 to 25 days, mean = 3.3). All patients survived. While 227 (97%) were discharged to home, 5 (2.2%) were discharged to other hospitals/trauma centers and 2 (0.8%) went to a rehabilitation facility. Most injuries (77%) occurred from April to September and from noon to 6pm (n=118, 69%). Falls from playground equipment (n=155, 73%) constituted the highest proportion of injury descriptions. Most ISS's were mild to moderate (n=208, 90%). There was a weak correlation between age and ISS (r = -.141, p=.032) and between ISS and ICU LOS (r=.330, p=&lt;.00I). Of 421 injuries (mean=1.8/patient), most were upper extremity (n=117) and head (n=II0).<br/><br/>Conclusions: Playground-related injuries were an infrequent occurrence (234/35,676 or 6.56/1,000) of mild to moderate severity that did not result in fatal injury among children admitted to Pennsylvania trauma centers, with a very small fraction (0.8%) requiring rehabilitation services. Characteristics of these children were similar to published reports. Emergency nurses should be alert for injuries following playground falls and should advocate for protective surfacing, low equipment height and proper adult supervision. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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