Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover of Pediatric Emergency Department Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162737
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover of Pediatric Emergency Department Nurses
Abstract:
Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover of Pediatric Emergency Department Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Bratt, Marilyn M., RN, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University & University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact Address:University of Wisconsin-Marquette, 401 Wythe Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314, USA
Purpose: High levels of stress, pressure of time constraints, emotionally charged family situations, and the need for rapid decision-making can threaten job satisfaction of pediatric emergency department nurses. Dissatisfaction with work can cause poor performance, lower productivity, and staff turnover. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the influences of nurse demographic characteristics and work environment factors on job satisfaction and anticipated turnover of nurses employed in pediatric emergency departments.

Design: A cross-sectional, exploratory survey design was used.

Setting: The study was conducted in 12 pediatric healthcare institutions belonging to the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI), an association of pediatric facilities in the United States and Canada.

Sample: The sample consisted of 342 nurses who were currently employed in a pediatric emergency department for a minimum of three (3) months. The majority of the participants were female (91.2%) and the average age was 37 years. The participants were relatively experienced with an average of over eight years working in pediatric emergency nursing.

Methodology: The children's healthcare association (NACHRI) coordinated the study. Each participating institution had a designated site coordinator who was responsible for implementation of the study at that site. In addition to demographic information, the following variables were measured using self-report questionnaires: anticipated turnover (Anticipated Turnover Scale), job satisfaction (Index of Work Satisfaction), nursing leadership (Leadership Empowerment Behaviors), and job stress (Nursing Job Stress). All instruments demonstrated adequate reliability (a = .86 - .96) with subscales ranging from .63 - .95.

Results: Pearson correlation, regression analysis, and ANOVA were performed to determine relationships among the variables. Job satisfaction was most highly correlated with job stress (r = -.68), followed by nursing leadership (r = .61) and anticipated turnover (r = -.56). Regression analysis revealed that anticipated turnover, nursing leadership, and job stress explained 57.7% of the variance in job satisfaction, with nursing leadership explaining the most variance. Differences were found across the study variables in relationship to nurses' age, years in current position, and shift worked.

Conclusion: Pediatric emergency department nurses who had more positive perceptions of the department nursing leadership were more satisfied in their jobs and were less likely to leave their positions. Nurses who perceived high levels of stress and were less satisfied with their jobs were more likely to leave their positions. Reducing job stressors and implementing management techniques that empower nurses to effectively perform their jobs may enhance work satisfaction and diminish turnover. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover of Pediatric Emergency Department Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162737-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover of Pediatric Emergency Department Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bratt, Marilyn M., RN, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University &amp; University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Marquette, 401 Wythe Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brattm@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: High levels of stress, pressure of time constraints, emotionally charged family situations, and the need for rapid decision-making can threaten job satisfaction of pediatric emergency department nurses. Dissatisfaction with work can cause poor performance, lower productivity, and staff turnover. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the influences of nurse demographic characteristics and work environment factors on job satisfaction and anticipated turnover of nurses employed in pediatric emergency departments.<br/><br/>Design: A cross-sectional, exploratory survey design was used.<br/><br/>Setting: The study was conducted in 12 pediatric healthcare institutions belonging to the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI), an association of pediatric facilities in the United States and Canada.<br/><br/>Sample: The sample consisted of 342 nurses who were currently employed in a pediatric emergency department for a minimum of three (3) months. The majority of the participants were female (91.2%) and the average age was 37 years. The participants were relatively experienced with an average of over eight years working in pediatric emergency nursing.<br/><br/>Methodology: The children's healthcare association (NACHRI) coordinated the study. Each participating institution had a designated site coordinator who was responsible for implementation of the study at that site. In addition to demographic information, the following variables were measured using self-report questionnaires: anticipated turnover (Anticipated Turnover Scale), job satisfaction (Index of Work Satisfaction), nursing leadership (Leadership Empowerment Behaviors), and job stress (Nursing Job Stress). All instruments demonstrated adequate reliability (a = .86 - .96) with subscales ranging from .63 - .95.<br/><br/>Results: Pearson correlation, regression analysis, and ANOVA were performed to determine relationships among the variables. Job satisfaction was most highly correlated with job stress (r = -.68), followed by nursing leadership (r = .61) and anticipated turnover (r = -.56). Regression analysis revealed that anticipated turnover, nursing leadership, and job stress explained 57.7% of the variance in job satisfaction, with nursing leadership explaining the most variance. Differences were found across the study variables in relationship to nurses' age, years in current position, and shift worked.<br/><br/>Conclusion: Pediatric emergency department nurses who had more positive perceptions of the department nursing leadership were more satisfied in their jobs and were less likely to leave their positions. Nurses who perceived high levels of stress and were less satisfied with their jobs were more likely to leave their positions. Reducing job stressors and implementing management techniques that empower nurses to effectively perform their jobs may enhance work satisfaction and diminish turnover. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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