Thermal Efficiency of Prer-warmed Cotton, Reflective, and Forced Warm Air Inflatable Blankets in Trauma Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162741
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Thermal Efficiency of Prer-warmed Cotton, Reflective, and Forced Warm Air Inflatable Blankets in Trauma Patients
Abstract:
Thermal Efficiency of Prer-warmed Cotton, Reflective, and Forced Warm Air Inflatable Blankets in Trauma Patients
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Cohen, Sharon S., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Broward General Medical Center - Trauma Services
Contact Address:1600 S. Andrews Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 33316, USA
Contact Telephone:(954) 355-4990
Co-Authors:Janice Hayes, Ivan Puente, and Tracey Tordella
Purpose: Prevention of heat loss in the trauma patient is essential to the management of care, but little research has been done to document the effectiveness of available modalities. This study was done to compare the thermal efficiency of three methods of heat loss prevention.

Setting: The study was conducted in a trauma resuscitation unit at a Level I trauma center in the southeast.
Sample: Patients of all ages admitted with a trauma alert status (N=298), who were not hypothermic at the time of admission, were included in the study.

Design/Methodology: An experimental design was used. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups upon arrival at the trauma resuscitation unit. Any patient whose temperature dropped to 35 C would be dropped from the study and placed on a re-warming protocol. Each group had one of three protocols for heat loss prevention: Group 1: three pre-warmed cotton blankets (n=101). Group 2: reflective blanket and head covering over one pre-warmed, cotton blanket (n=98) Group 3: forced warm air inflatable blanket (n=99). Room temperature was controlled between 84-88 degrees (F). Foley, oral, or rectal temperatures were recorded every 15 minutes for the first hour, then hourly until the patient was transferred or discharged. Total core body temperature change was calculated for each subject using the difference between initial and final measurement. Nurses were asked to comment on and rate each method for ease of use, convenience, and access to the patient during care using a 1-5 Likert scale.

Results: All patients in the study remained in the normal temperature range. ANOVA results showed no significant differences in temperature change among the groups. Nurses significantly preferred pre-warmed and reflective blankets to the warm air inflatable blanket. Comments indicated a high degree of inconvenience in using the inflatable blanket. The pre-warmed cotton blankets were easy to use, but needed to be changed at intervals due to heat loss. The reflective blanket was convenient, but there were design problems with the caps for patients on a backboard.

Conclusions: Temperature stability was maintained for trauma patients using all three methods, however, the reflective blanket was considered easiest to use by the nurses. Recommendation was made to redesign the reflective head covering for use with back boards. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThermal Efficiency of Prer-warmed Cotton, Reflective, and Forced Warm Air Inflatable Blankets in Trauma Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162741-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Thermal Efficiency of Prer-warmed Cotton, Reflective, and Forced Warm Air Inflatable Blankets in Trauma Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cohen, Sharon S., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Broward General Medical Center - Trauma Services</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1600 S. Andrews Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 33316, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(954) 355-4990</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janice Hayes, Ivan Puente, and Tracey Tordella</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Prevention of heat loss in the trauma patient is essential to the management of care, but little research has been done to document the effectiveness of available modalities. This study was done to compare the thermal efficiency of three methods of heat loss prevention.<br/><br/>Setting: The study was conducted in a trauma resuscitation unit at a Level I trauma center in the southeast.<br/>Sample: Patients of all ages admitted with a trauma alert status (N=298), who were not hypothermic at the time of admission, were included in the study.<br/><br/>Design/Methodology: An experimental design was used. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups upon arrival at the trauma resuscitation unit. Any patient whose temperature dropped to 35 C would be dropped from the study and placed on a re-warming protocol. Each group had one of three protocols for heat loss prevention: Group 1: three pre-warmed cotton blankets (n=101). Group 2: reflective blanket and head covering over one pre-warmed, cotton blanket (n=98) Group 3: forced warm air inflatable blanket (n=99). Room temperature was controlled between 84-88 degrees (F). Foley, oral, or rectal temperatures were recorded every 15 minutes for the first hour, then hourly until the patient was transferred or discharged. Total core body temperature change was calculated for each subject using the difference between initial and final measurement. Nurses were asked to comment on and rate each method for ease of use, convenience, and access to the patient during care using a 1-5 Likert scale.<br/><br/>Results: All patients in the study remained in the normal temperature range. ANOVA results showed no significant differences in temperature change among the groups. Nurses significantly preferred pre-warmed and reflective blankets to the warm air inflatable blanket. Comments indicated a high degree of inconvenience in using the inflatable blanket. The pre-warmed cotton blankets were easy to use, but needed to be changed at intervals due to heat loss. The reflective blanket was convenient, but there were design problems with the caps for patients on a backboard.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Temperature stability was maintained for trauma patients using all three methods, however, the reflective blanket was considered easiest to use by the nurses. Recommendation was made to redesign the reflective head covering for use with back boards. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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