Physicians' Decision to Write Versus Not Write Prescriptions for Automated External Defibrillators for Post-First Myocardial Infarction Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162748
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physicians' Decision to Write Versus Not Write Prescriptions for Automated External Defibrillators for Post-First Myocardial Infarction Patients
Abstract:
Physicians' Decision to Write Versus Not Write Prescriptions for Automated External Defibrillators for Post-First Myocardial Infarction Patients
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Hunt, Sheila, RN, MN
P.I. Institution Name:Harrison Hospital
Contact Address:2520 Cherry Ave., Bremerton, WA, 98310, USA
Contact Telephone:(360) 792-6710
Co-Authors:Sharon Gavin Fought and Ruth E. Rea
Purpose: Adults who experience myocardial infarction (MI) are at greater risk of re-infarction and sudden cardiac death. Less than three percent of adults who experience sudden cardiac death are resuscitated to a functional level. Early defibrillation facilitates the restoration of normal blood flow, greatly increasing the chance of neurologic survival in patients delivered to emergency departments. Introduction of the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) into the home environment is a relatively new concept. The purpose of this study was to determine whether physicians would write or would not write prescriptions for AEDs for post-first MI patients, and what factors physicians consider during their decision making.

Design: A descriptive research design was used.

Sample: A purposive sample of 229 physicians with admission privileges at a 295-bed, pacific-northwest hospital was utilized. Surveys returned by cardiologists/internists (n=7) and family practitioners (n=16) were used for analysis (response rate 28%). Surveys were color-coded for physician specialty.

Methodology: A researcher-generated, 21-item questionnaire was mailed to physicians' offices. Questions were categorized and posed as a check list of factors. Factor categories included AED technology, out-of-hospital defibrillation, patient factors, and physician factors. Physicians were instructed to check all factors considered when making decisions to write or not write prescriptions for AEDs. Content validity was verified by a panel of experts.

Results: Twelve physicians indicated they would write prescriptions for AEDs (cardiologists/internists, n=4; family practitioners, n=8). Physicians willing to write prescriptions for AEDs selected more factors overall (n=121, 50%) than factors selected by physicians not willing to write prescriptions for AEDs (n=102, 46%). Technologic factors were chosen with the most frequency by all physicians (n=58). Cardiologists/internists (n=2, 29%) and family practitioners (n=5, 31 %) identified "potential risk of litigation" and "other physicians writing prescriptions for AEDs" as factors in decision making.

Conclusions: This study demonstrated physicians were willing to write prescriptions for AEDs for post-first MI patients. Response frequency to technologic factors stressed the need for physician education. Implications for nursing practice include patient/family AED instruction in acute care/clinic/home heath arenas, development of community programs for seniors and cardiac rehabilitation patients, and public access to defibrillation projects in conjunction with emergency medical services. Areas for further research include replication with larger sample, AED efficacy, and emotional impact on family post-AED use. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysicians' Decision to Write Versus Not Write Prescriptions for Automated External Defibrillators for Post-First Myocardial Infarction Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162748-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physicians' Decision to Write Versus Not Write Prescriptions for Automated External Defibrillators for Post-First Myocardial Infarction Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hunt, Sheila, RN, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Harrison Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2520 Cherry Ave., Bremerton, WA, 98310, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(360) 792-6710</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">belfairJim@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sharon Gavin Fought and Ruth E. Rea</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Adults who experience myocardial infarction (MI) are at greater risk of re-infarction and sudden cardiac death. Less than three percent of adults who experience sudden cardiac death are resuscitated to a functional level. Early defibrillation facilitates the restoration of normal blood flow, greatly increasing the chance of neurologic survival in patients delivered to emergency departments. Introduction of the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) into the home environment is a relatively new concept. The purpose of this study was to determine whether physicians would write or would not write prescriptions for AEDs for post-first MI patients, and what factors physicians consider during their decision making.<br/><br/>Design: A descriptive research design was used.<br/><br/>Sample: A purposive sample of 229 physicians with admission privileges at a 295-bed, pacific-northwest hospital was utilized. Surveys returned by cardiologists/internists (n=7) and family practitioners (n=16) were used for analysis (response rate 28%). Surveys were color-coded for physician specialty.<br/><br/>Methodology: A researcher-generated, 21-item questionnaire was mailed to physicians' offices. Questions were categorized and posed as a check list of factors. Factor categories included AED technology, out-of-hospital defibrillation, patient factors, and physician factors. Physicians were instructed to check all factors considered when making decisions to write or not write prescriptions for AEDs. Content validity was verified by a panel of experts.<br/><br/>Results: Twelve physicians indicated they would write prescriptions for AEDs (cardiologists/internists, n=4; family practitioners, n=8). Physicians willing to write prescriptions for AEDs selected more factors overall (n=121, 50%) than factors selected by physicians not willing to write prescriptions for AEDs (n=102, 46%). Technologic factors were chosen with the most frequency by all physicians (n=58). Cardiologists/internists (n=2, 29%) and family practitioners (n=5, 31 %) identified &quot;potential risk of litigation&quot; and &quot;other physicians writing prescriptions for AEDs&quot; as factors in decision making.<br/><br/>Conclusions: This study demonstrated physicians were willing to write prescriptions for AEDs for post-first MI patients. Response frequency to technologic factors stressed the need for physician education. Implications for nursing practice include patient/family AED instruction in acute care/clinic/home heath arenas, development of community programs for seniors and cardiac rehabilitation patients, and public access to defibrillation projects in conjunction with emergency medical services. Areas for further research include replication with larger sample, AED efficacy, and emotional impact on family post-AED use. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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