2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162751
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision-Making Process Nurses Use to Provide Cultural Care
Abstract:
Decision-Making Process Nurses Use to Provide Cultural Care
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Maiocco, Gina, RN, PhD, CCRN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Xavier University
Contact Address:3800 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati, OH, 45207, USA
Contact Telephone:(513) 745-3836
Purpose: The rapidly diversifying U.S. population necessitates nurses be culturally competent. Community based research and literature has identified communication, education, experience, and critical thinking as essential to achieving cultural competence, but how do these variables interact within clinical settings? Specifically, how do nurses define culturally competent care, how do nurses decide to provide culturally competent care, and how is this care provided?

Design: A qualitative, grounded theory, descriptive design was used.

Setting: In a western state, five (5) units (3 ER, 2 OB) of community hospitals with a highly div, were accessed.

Sample: Emergency and obstetric nurses with at least 6 months experience were recruited. Twenty-six (26) nurses who participated (17 ER, 9 OB) had worked at least 4 years in nursing, ranged in ages 26-57 (mean = 42 years), were female (n=25), had different educations (12 ADNs, 11 BSN, 3 APRN), held different positions (4 managers, 3 educators, 19 staff), and primarily spoke English (7 of 26 bilingual).

Methodology: Nurses completed a demographic questionnaire then were interviewed by the researcher using vignettes that stimulated reflection of personal experiences. Constant comparative analysis was applied to data as the grounded theory, 'juggling choices" was developed around the core variable of "understanding". Interrater reliability of 90% for coding was established. Participating units were briefed on and concurred with study findings, thereby establishing confirmability, audibility, and credibility of the process and definition identified.

Results: Nurses juggle care choices within self-imposed and/or organizational time limitations. Basic care, adaptive care, or a combination of the two, is delivered to patients based upon the nurse's understanding of the situation. Personal experiences and attitude, coupled with resource availability and environmental factors, influenced the nurses' actions. Educational degrees did not impact decisions. Previous patient care interactions, interpreter mistrust, negative peer influences, absent organizational support, and high unit acuity complicated choice selection, often leading to care rationing. For participants, the term "cultural competence" did not accurately depict events, therefore a clinical, data-based, pictorial definition was devised to capture the nurses' interpretations and to foster ongoing behavioral evaluation.

Conclusions: Cultural care is time sensitive and dynamic. How nurses interpret time spent caring for culturally diverse patients either positively or negatively impacts future care decisions. Multiple variables influence how the nurse chooses to deliver care, necessitating further research into experience interpretation, experiential learning, organizational involvement, and cultural education effectiveness. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision-Making Process Nurses Use to Provide Cultural Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162751-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decision-Making Process Nurses Use to Provide Cultural Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maiocco, Gina, RN, PhD, CCRN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Xavier University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3800 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati, OH, 45207, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513) 745-3836</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Maiocco@xavier.xu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The rapidly diversifying U.S. population necessitates nurses be culturally competent. Community based research and literature has identified communication, education, experience, and critical thinking as essential to achieving cultural competence, but how do these variables interact within clinical settings? Specifically, how do nurses define culturally competent care, how do nurses decide to provide culturally competent care, and how is this care provided?<br/><br/>Design: A qualitative, grounded theory, descriptive design was used.<br/><br/>Setting: In a western state, five (5) units (3 ER, 2 OB) of community hospitals with a highly div, were accessed.<br/><br/>Sample: Emergency and obstetric nurses with at least 6 months experience were recruited. Twenty-six (26) nurses who participated (17 ER, 9 OB) had worked at least 4 years in nursing, ranged in ages 26-57 (mean = 42 years), were female (n=25), had different educations (12 ADNs, 11 BSN, 3 APRN), held different positions (4 managers, 3 educators, 19 staff), and primarily spoke English (7 of 26 bilingual).<br/><br/>Methodology: Nurses completed a demographic questionnaire then were interviewed by the researcher using vignettes that stimulated reflection of personal experiences. Constant comparative analysis was applied to data as the grounded theory, 'juggling choices&quot; was developed around the core variable of &quot;understanding&quot;. Interrater reliability of 90% for coding was established. Participating units were briefed on and concurred with study findings, thereby establishing confirmability, audibility, and credibility of the process and definition identified.<br/><br/>Results: Nurses juggle care choices within self-imposed and/or organizational time limitations. Basic care, adaptive care, or a combination of the two, is delivered to patients based upon the nurse's understanding of the situation. Personal experiences and attitude, coupled with resource availability and environmental factors, influenced the nurses' actions. Educational degrees did not impact decisions. Previous patient care interactions, interpreter mistrust, negative peer influences, absent organizational support, and high unit acuity complicated choice selection, often leading to care rationing. For participants, the term &quot;cultural competence&quot; did not accurately depict events, therefore a clinical, data-based, pictorial definition was devised to capture the nurses' interpretations and to foster ongoing behavioral evaluation.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Cultural care is time sensitive and dynamic. How nurses interpret time spent caring for culturally diverse patients either positively or negatively impacts future care decisions. Multiple variables influence how the nurse chooses to deliver care, necessitating further research into experience interpretation, experiential learning, organizational involvement, and cultural education effectiveness. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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