Perception of Threat of Workplace Violence Among Emergency Department Nurses in New Jersey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162753
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perception of Threat of Workplace Violence Among Emergency Department Nurses in New Jersey
Abstract:
Perception of Threat of Workplace Violence Among Emergency Department Nurses in New Jersey
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:McClellan, Ruth Ann, BSN, RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Meridian Health System - Limited Service Emergency Dept.
Contact Address:305 Grant Avenue, Deal Park, NJ, 07723, USA
Contact Telephone:(732) 840-3380
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to further validate the Emergency Department Environmental Comfort Scale (EDECS) and determine relationships between level of perception of threat of workplace violence and selected demographic and environmental variables. As noted in the literature, ED nurses have the highest rate of assaults in the workplace of all categories of healthcare providers; 67% of ED nurses report that they have been assaulted at least once in their careers.

Design: This was a descriptive study.

Sample: New Jersey members of the Emergency Nurses Association were surveyed. Of the 1,086 members, 435 (40%) returned a completed survey. The mean age of the respondents was 42 years (SD = 8.2). The gender of the respondents was 87.7% female and 12.3% male; years of experience within the ED ranged from 1 to 40 years (Mean = 11.7).

Methodology: The EDECS is a 15 item tool using a 5-point rating scale with endpoints of "never" to "always." Possible scores range from 15 to 75 with higher scores indicating escalating levels of fear of workplace violence. Evidence of construct validity and internal reliability (alpha = 0.95) was previously demonstrated. All New Jersey members of the ENA were mailed a cover letter, the EDECS and demographic questions, and a self-addressed, stamped, return envelope. Return of the survey acted as its own consent. A follow-up postcard to all survey recipients was sent three weeks after the initial mailing as a reminder.

Results: Scores on the EDECS ranged from 15 to 72 with a mean of 35.47 (SD = 11.96) A principal component factor analysis was performed on the 15 items of the EDECS using a Varimax rotation. A five factor solution was found: a) outside the building, b) in the building outside of the department, c) miscellaneous department areas, d) examination rooms, and e) ambulance entrance. An association between higher levels of threat and lack of ED security and seeing a colleague assaulted was found, further validating the instrument.

Conclusions: Results indicate that the sample of nurses from NJENA demonstrated a range of fear of workplace violence, with the mean score indicating a moderate level of fear. Interestingly, nurses who had seen a colleague assaulted had a higher level of fear than those who did not, but these same relationships did not hold true for nurses who had experienced assault themselves. The findings have implications for both counseling and for policies on reporting assaults. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerception of Threat of Workplace Violence Among Emergency Department Nurses in New Jerseyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162753-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perception of Threat of Workplace Violence Among Emergency Department Nurses in New Jersey</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McClellan, Ruth Ann, BSN, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Meridian Health System - Limited Service Emergency Dept.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">305 Grant Avenue, Deal Park, NJ, 07723, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(732) 840-3380</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ruthannm@monmouth.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to further validate the Emergency Department Environmental Comfort Scale (EDECS) and determine relationships between level of perception of threat of workplace violence and selected demographic and environmental variables. As noted in the literature, ED nurses have the highest rate of assaults in the workplace of all categories of healthcare providers; 67% of ED nurses report that they have been assaulted at least once in their careers.<br/><br/>Design: This was a descriptive study.<br/><br/>Sample: New Jersey members of the Emergency Nurses Association were surveyed. Of the 1,086 members, 435 (40%) returned a completed survey. The mean age of the respondents was 42 years (SD = 8.2). The gender of the respondents was 87.7% female and 12.3% male; years of experience within the ED ranged from 1 to 40 years (Mean = 11.7).<br/><br/>Methodology: The EDECS is a 15 item tool using a 5-point rating scale with endpoints of &quot;never&quot; to &quot;always.&quot; Possible scores range from 15 to 75 with higher scores indicating escalating levels of fear of workplace violence. Evidence of construct validity and internal reliability (alpha = 0.95) was previously demonstrated. All New Jersey members of the ENA were mailed a cover letter, the EDECS and demographic questions, and a self-addressed, stamped, return envelope. Return of the survey acted as its own consent. A follow-up postcard to all survey recipients was sent three weeks after the initial mailing as a reminder.<br/><br/>Results: Scores on the EDECS ranged from 15 to 72 with a mean of 35.47 (SD = 11.96) A principal component factor analysis was performed on the 15 items of the EDECS using a Varimax rotation. A five factor solution was found: a) outside the building, b) in the building outside of the department, c) miscellaneous department areas, d) examination rooms, and e) ambulance entrance. An association between higher levels of threat and lack of ED security and seeing a colleague assaulted was found, further validating the instrument.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Results indicate that the sample of nurses from NJENA demonstrated a range of fear of workplace violence, with the mean score indicating a moderate level of fear. Interestingly, nurses who had seen a colleague assaulted had a higher level of fear than those who did not, but these same relationships did not hold true for nurses who had experienced assault themselves. The findings have implications for both counseling and for policies on reporting assaults. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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