Triage Investigation: Determining Gender Specific Descriptions Associated with Myorcardian Ischemia or Infarct

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Triage Investigation: Determining Gender Specific Descriptions Associated with Myorcardian Ischemia or Infarct
Abstract:
Triage Investigation: Determining Gender Specific Descriptions Associated with Myorcardian Ischemia or Infarct
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Mullis, Georgianne, RN, BSN, CCRN, CEN, FNE, CNIII
P.I. Institution Name:Duke University Medical Center
Contact Address:Box 3869, Emergency Dept., Durham, NC, 27710, USA
Contact Telephone:(919) 684-2413
Clinical Topic: Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in women over the age of forty and significantly increases mortality for women. Emergency department (ED) health care providers lack sufficient knowledge regarding presenting symptoms of ischemia or infarct in women that will initiate an improved triage system of questions, criteria, and protocols. Our ED staff initiated this project to determine if there is a gender difference in relation to the way women present with and describe cardiac symptoms at triage.

Implementation: Three members of our Cardiac Care Team worked with staff from other hospital departments to research current literature, develop the project proposal, and obtain hospital administration approval and funding. Through bulletin boards, staff meetings, word of mouth, and printed materials, the ED staff was instructed in the use of a Chest Pain Assessment tool that was developed by the team. Following staff education, these one-page tools were placed in triage and throughout the department for easy access. Staff nurses recorded presenting symptoms as described in the patient's own words and checked descriptor blocks to indicate age; gender; account number; diagnosis; quality, radiation, and severity of pain; timing; and other associated symptoms. Completed tools were placed in a central collection box.

Outcomes: Staff submitted fifty-eight tools, yielding a sample of thirty-three women and twenty-five men over the age of twenty-one whose final diagnosis was unstable angina or myocardial infarction. Our project offers data, supported by literature, that men and women describe their symptoms differently. Women described gastrointestinal symptoms associated with cardiac ischemia much more often than men did. Of the sample group describing nausea, 74% were women, and 60% of women reported vomiting. 100% of those complaining of epigastric pain were women. Of patients describing weakness and jaw pain, women represented more than 66% in each group.

Recommendations: As a result of this project, the investigators, Cardiac Care Team, and department managers of the ED recommend that: (1) the investigators and members of the Cardiac Care Team develop teaching materials to include the expanded gender-specific descriptions of pain; (2) refine triage criteria and protocols that will improve the rapid response system to meet the needs of both men and women; (3) continue research to study symptoms and presentations of the more acute ischemic/infarct populations; and (4) share and compare data with other departments and hospitals. {Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTriage Investigation: Determining Gender Specific Descriptions Associated with Myorcardian Ischemia or Infarcten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Triage Investigation: Determining Gender Specific Descriptions Associated with Myorcardian Ischemia or Infarct</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mullis, Georgianne, RN, BSN, CCRN, CEN, FNE, CNIII</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duke University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 3869, Emergency Dept., Durham, NC, 27710, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(919) 684-2413</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jamestownehomes@mindspring.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in women over the age of forty and significantly increases mortality for women. Emergency department (ED) health care providers lack sufficient knowledge regarding presenting symptoms of ischemia or infarct in women that will initiate an improved triage system of questions, criteria, and protocols. Our ED staff initiated this project to determine if there is a gender difference in relation to the way women present with and describe cardiac symptoms at triage.<br/><br/>Implementation: Three members of our Cardiac Care Team worked with staff from other hospital departments to research current literature, develop the project proposal, and obtain hospital administration approval and funding. Through bulletin boards, staff meetings, word of mouth, and printed materials, the ED staff was instructed in the use of a Chest Pain Assessment tool that was developed by the team. Following staff education, these one-page tools were placed in triage and throughout the department for easy access. Staff nurses recorded presenting symptoms as described in the patient's own words and checked descriptor blocks to indicate age; gender; account number; diagnosis; quality, radiation, and severity of pain; timing; and other associated symptoms. Completed tools were placed in a central collection box.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Staff submitted fifty-eight tools, yielding a sample of thirty-three women and twenty-five men over the age of twenty-one whose final diagnosis was unstable angina or myocardial infarction. Our project offers data, supported by literature, that men and women describe their symptoms differently. Women described gastrointestinal symptoms associated with cardiac ischemia much more often than men did. Of the sample group describing nausea, 74% were women, and 60% of women reported vomiting. 100% of those complaining of epigastric pain were women. Of patients describing weakness and jaw pain, women represented more than 66% in each group.<br/><br/>Recommendations: As a result of this project, the investigators, Cardiac Care Team, and department managers of the ED recommend that: (1) the investigators and members of the Cardiac Care Team develop teaching materials to include the expanded gender-specific descriptions of pain; (2) refine triage criteria and protocols that will improve the rapid response system to meet the needs of both men and women; (3) continue research to study symptoms and presentations of the more acute ischemic/infarct populations; and (4) share and compare data with other departments and hospitals. {Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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