Fever Phobia: Does Parent Education Reduce Fever Anxiety and Increase Parent Home Management Skills?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162756
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fever Phobia: Does Parent Education Reduce Fever Anxiety and Increase Parent Home Management Skills?
Abstract:
Fever Phobia: Does Parent Education Reduce Fever Anxiety and Increase Parent Home Management Skills?
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Murphy, Kathleen A., RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Emergency Department
Contact Address:34th & Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA
Contact Telephone:(215) 590-3480
Co-Authors:Monica Liebman and Jane Barnsteiner
Purpose: Many parents are fearful with elevations in their child's temperature and seek emergency care for treatment off ever, which they perceive as difficult to manage at home. This study applied Bandura's Social Cognitive theory to parent home management and fever education. The aims of this study were to determine if a "standard" or "interactive" fever education program: (1) reduced parent fever anxiety and (2) increased parent fever home management skills, reducing return ED visits.

Design: A quasi-experimental, pre-test/post-test study examining parental fever anxiety was conducted in a pediatric emergency department /Level One Trauma Center that has approximately 60,000 visits annually.

Sample: Eligible study participants included 87 parents with children ages 3 months to 5 years presenting with fever >38.4 degrees C.

Methodology: The convenience sample was collected over 18 months. Parents were assigned a fever education program: odd days received the "standard program" with written fever discharge instruction sheet; even days received the "interactive program" that included the fever discharge instruction sheet, thermometer instruction, and practitioner question-answer discussion. Both groups were tested on thermometer technique, and rated their level of fever anxiety on a 5-point Likert scale upon arrival to the ED, and following either fever education program. Two and eight week phone follow-up interviews were conducted. Data were analyzed using unpaired t -tests, Chi square, and Pearson coefficient.

Results: Participants in both education programs had similar demographics and were primarily English speaking, African-American caretakers who completed at least the ninth grade. Over 85% of parents were able to accurately read a specific educational thermometer when tested before either fever education program. About one-half of the study participants in each group initially rated "moderated to high" levels of fever anxiety upon arrival to the ED. After both types of fever education programs, over 85% of study participants had a significant reduction in fever anxiety, rated as "low-none".

Conclusion: Both educational methods were equally effective in reducing parental fever anxiety. Emergency nurses are in a pivotal role to provide parents with accurate fever information and education while allaying their fears and addressing the individual concerns regarding their child's present febrile illness. Additional research needs to be conducted in the area of fever phobia and the ideal forum for patient education outside the ED. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFever Phobia: Does Parent Education Reduce Fever Anxiety and Increase Parent Home Management Skills?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162756-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fever Phobia: Does Parent Education Reduce Fever Anxiety and Increase Parent Home Management Skills?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murphy, Kathleen A., RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">34th &amp; Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(215) 590-3480</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">murphyk@email.chop.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Monica Liebman and Jane Barnsteiner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Many parents are fearful with elevations in their child's temperature and seek emergency care for treatment off ever, which they perceive as difficult to manage at home. This study applied Bandura's Social Cognitive theory to parent home management and fever education. The aims of this study were to determine if a &quot;standard&quot; or &quot;interactive&quot; fever education program: (1) reduced parent fever anxiety and (2) increased parent fever home management skills, reducing return ED visits.<br/><br/>Design: A quasi-experimental, pre-test/post-test study examining parental fever anxiety was conducted in a pediatric emergency department /Level One Trauma Center that has approximately 60,000 visits annually.<br/><br/>Sample: Eligible study participants included 87 parents with children ages 3 months to 5 years presenting with fever &gt;38.4 degrees C.<br/><br/>Methodology: The convenience sample was collected over 18 months. Parents were assigned a fever education program: odd days received the &quot;standard program&quot; with written fever discharge instruction sheet; even days received the &quot;interactive program&quot; that included the fever discharge instruction sheet, thermometer instruction, and practitioner question-answer discussion. Both groups were tested on thermometer technique, and rated their level of fever anxiety on a 5-point Likert scale upon arrival to the ED, and following either fever education program. Two and eight week phone follow-up interviews were conducted. Data were analyzed using unpaired t -tests, Chi square, and Pearson coefficient.<br/><br/>Results: Participants in both education programs had similar demographics and were primarily English speaking, African-American caretakers who completed at least the ninth grade. Over 85% of parents were able to accurately read a specific educational thermometer when tested before either fever education program. About one-half of the study participants in each group initially rated &quot;moderated to high&quot; levels of fever anxiety upon arrival to the ED. After both types of fever education programs, over 85% of study participants had a significant reduction in fever anxiety, rated as &quot;low-none&quot;.<br/><br/>Conclusion: Both educational methods were equally effective in reducing parental fever anxiety. Emergency nurses are in a pivotal role to provide parents with accurate fever information and education while allaying their fears and addressing the individual concerns regarding their child's present febrile illness. Additional research needs to be conducted in the area of fever phobia and the ideal forum for patient education outside the ED. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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