2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162760
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Needs of Family Members of Critically Ill Patients in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Needs of Family Members of Critically Ill Patients in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Presley, Diane, RN, MSN, DON
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Medical Center
Contact Address:1201 W. 38th Street, Austin, TX, 78705, USA
Contact Telephone:(512) 324-1031
Co-Authors:Gail Robinson
Purpose: The responsibility of emergency nurses and physicians extend beyond the patient to members of their family. Most of the staff s energy is focused in delivering patient care in frequently what is a crisis situation. The impact and influence the family has for the sick patients short and long-term recovery is tremendous. Knowledge of family needs makes staff efforts more effective in how they incorporate significant others in the ongoing plan of care. The purpose of this study was to investigate self reported perceptions of family needs.

Design/Setting: This exploratory, descriptive survey was conducted in a large not for profit hospital located in Texas. The population consisted of relatives or significant others of critically ill patients admitted to the emergency department (ED).

Method: A convenience sample of family members and significant others consisted of 45 persons 18 years or older, who were present the duration of the patients ED stay. Needs were measured by using the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI). Subjects were asked to indicate the importance of needs on a self reporting, 45 item four-point Likert scale; "1" not important to "4" very important. Mean scores were calculated for the sample then ranked in order of importance. The instrument was found to have acceptable content validity and test - retest reliability calculated for 86.7%.

Results: The subjects were related to the patients as follows: 3% parents, 76% spouses, 15% significant others, and 6% adult children. The most important need statement was to "have the best possible care given to the patients," followed by in order of importance, "have explanations given in terms that are understandable," "to have questions answered honestly," "to know the prognosis," and "to feel there was hope." Least important needs were, ''to help with the patient's care," followed by "to talk about feelings."

Conclusion: Nurses must appreciate the urgent priority of assuring that the best possible care is being delivered to the patient. Reassurance was sought by the family through verbal communication. To be frequently available to answer questions and to provide relevant information honestly is essential. Staff energy can be directed to the needs and concerns that matter most to the emergency department population. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeeds of Family Members of Critically Ill Patients in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162760-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Needs of Family Members of Critically Ill Patients in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Presley, Diane, RN, MSN, DON</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1201 W. 38th Street, Austin, TX, 78705, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(512) 324-1031</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Dpresley@Seton.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gail Robinson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The responsibility of emergency nurses and physicians extend beyond the patient to members of their family. Most of the staff s energy is focused in delivering patient care in frequently what is a crisis situation. The impact and influence the family has for the sick patients short and long-term recovery is tremendous. Knowledge of family needs makes staff efforts more effective in how they incorporate significant others in the ongoing plan of care. The purpose of this study was to investigate self reported perceptions of family needs.<br/><br/>Design/Setting: This exploratory, descriptive survey was conducted in a large not for profit hospital located in Texas. The population consisted of relatives or significant others of critically ill patients admitted to the emergency department (ED).<br/><br/>Method: A convenience sample of family members and significant others consisted of 45 persons 18 years or older, who were present the duration of the patients ED stay. Needs were measured by using the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI). Subjects were asked to indicate the importance of needs on a self reporting, 45 item four-point Likert scale; &quot;1&quot; not important to &quot;4&quot; very important. Mean scores were calculated for the sample then ranked in order of importance. The instrument was found to have acceptable content validity and test - retest reliability calculated for 86.7%.<br/><br/>Results: The subjects were related to the patients as follows: 3% parents, 76% spouses, 15% significant others, and 6% adult children. The most important need statement was to &quot;have the best possible care given to the patients,&quot; followed by in order of importance, &quot;have explanations given in terms that are understandable,&quot; &quot;to have questions answered honestly,&quot; &quot;to know the prognosis,&quot; and &quot;to feel there was hope.&quot; Least important needs were, ''to help with the patient's care,&quot; followed by &quot;to talk about feelings.&quot;<br/><br/>Conclusion: Nurses must appreciate the urgent priority of assuring that the best possible care is being delivered to the patient. Reassurance was sought by the family through verbal communication. To be frequently available to answer questions and to provide relevant information honestly is essential. Staff energy can be directed to the needs and concerns that matter most to the emergency department population. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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