The Impact of an ED-Based Violence Prevention Program on Adolescents' Attitudes and Beliefs Towards Violence: VIP (Violence is Preventable) Tour

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162763
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of an ED-Based Violence Prevention Program on Adolescents' Attitudes and Beliefs Towards Violence: VIP (Violence is Preventable) Tour
Abstract:
The Impact of an ED-Based Violence Prevention Program on Adolescents' Attitudes and Beliefs Towards Violence: VIP (Violence is Preventable) Tour
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Safi, Clara, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Boston Medical Center, Emergency Dept.
Contact Address:One Boston Medical Center Place, Boston, MA, 02115, USA
Contact Telephone:(617) 414-5895
Co-Authors:Carol Harris, Clara Safi, Patricia Mitchell, Beth Kastner and Darah Smethurst
Purpose: Social Learning Theory suggests that providing alternative behavioral models and new knowledge alters learned behaviors such as aggression and violence. Many violence prevention projects exist but scientific evaluation of their effectiveness is lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an ED-based violence prevention program (VIP Tour) on adolescents' attitudes and beliefs towards violence.

Design: Pre and post-intervention questionnaires were administered to all adolescents a week before and 30 days after the tour.

Setting: The study was conducted at an urban level 1 trauma center with an annual census of 70,000 visits.

Sample: A sample of 173 inner-city adolescents were recruited, ages 11 to 19 years (mean 15 years). Females comprised 62% of the study population, 87% were non-white and 76% were born in the U.S.

Methodology: The study intervention, the VIP Tour, included: (I) evening tour of the ED; (2) hands-on demonstration of trauma room equipment; (3) video and discussion of trauma cases; and (4) interviews with ED staff (positive role models) about their job and their training. Two assessment tools were used: (1) a 6 item, 30 point questionnaire measuring attitudes toward violence and its acceptability. Higher scores indicate a positive attitude toward violent strategies and limited use of nonviolent strategies, with an internal consistency for reliability and validity of 0.67; (2) a 9 item. 24 point questionnaire measuring beliefs about conflict and perceptions of familial beliefs on fighting and weapon carrying. Higher scores indicate poor conflict resolution beliefs. Paired t test and descriptive statistics were determined using Epi Info 6.0.

Results: The mean (+/- SD) pre-intervention and post-intervention scores of attitude toward violence were 17.4 +/- 4.0 and 15.2 +/- 4.2 respectively (p<0.05), indicating a shift away from violence. The mean (+/- SD) pre-intervention and post-intervention scores of beliefs about conflict were 15.9 +/- 2.4 and 15.2 +/- 1.9 respectively (p<0.05), indicating improved beliefs about conflict resolution.

Conclusions: The ED-based violence prevention program had a positive impact on attitudes and beliefs towards violence. At 30 days, adolescents showed an improved attitude about the use of violent strategies and an enhancement on their conflict resolution beliefs. Violence is Preventable Tour can serve as a national model for violence prevention. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of an ED-Based Violence Prevention Program on Adolescents' Attitudes and Beliefs Towards Violence: VIP (Violence is Preventable) Touren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162763-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of an ED-Based Violence Prevention Program on Adolescents' Attitudes and Beliefs Towards Violence: VIP (Violence is Preventable) Tour</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Safi, Clara, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston Medical Center, Emergency Dept.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One Boston Medical Center Place, Boston, MA, 02115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(617) 414-5895</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clara.berty@bmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Harris, Clara Safi, Patricia Mitchell, Beth Kastner and Darah Smethurst</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Social Learning Theory suggests that providing alternative behavioral models and new knowledge alters learned behaviors such as aggression and violence. Many violence prevention projects exist but scientific evaluation of their effectiveness is lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an ED-based violence prevention program (VIP Tour) on adolescents' attitudes and beliefs towards violence.<br/><br/>Design: Pre and post-intervention questionnaires were administered to all adolescents a week before and 30 days after the tour.<br/><br/>Setting: The study was conducted at an urban level 1 trauma center with an annual census of 70,000 visits.<br/><br/>Sample: A sample of 173 inner-city adolescents were recruited, ages 11 to 19 years (mean 15 years). Females comprised 62% of the study population, 87% were non-white and 76% were born in the U.S.<br/><br/>Methodology: The study intervention, the VIP Tour, included: (I) evening tour of the ED; (2) hands-on demonstration of trauma room equipment; (3) video and discussion of trauma cases; and (4) interviews with ED staff (positive role models) about their job and their training. Two assessment tools were used: (1) a 6 item, 30 point questionnaire measuring attitudes toward violence and its acceptability. Higher scores indicate a positive attitude toward violent strategies and limited use of nonviolent strategies, with an internal consistency for reliability and validity of 0.67; (2) a 9 item. 24 point questionnaire measuring beliefs about conflict and perceptions of familial beliefs on fighting and weapon carrying. Higher scores indicate poor conflict resolution beliefs. Paired t test and descriptive statistics were determined using Epi Info 6.0.<br/><br/>Results: The mean (+/- SD) pre-intervention and post-intervention scores of attitude toward violence were 17.4 +/- 4.0 and 15.2 +/- 4.2 respectively (p&lt;0.05), indicating a shift away from violence. The mean (+/- SD) pre-intervention and post-intervention scores of beliefs about conflict were 15.9 +/- 2.4 and 15.2 +/- 1.9 respectively (p&lt;0.05), indicating improved beliefs about conflict resolution.<br/><br/>Conclusions: The ED-based violence prevention program had a positive impact on attitudes and beliefs towards violence. At 30 days, adolescents showed an improved attitude about the use of violent strategies and an enhancement on their conflict resolution beliefs. Violence is Preventable Tour can serve as a national model for violence prevention. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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