Transportation of Emergency Department Patients on Trolleys by Head First Versus Feet First

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162765
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transportation of Emergency Department Patients on Trolleys by Head First Versus Feet First
Abstract:
Transportation of Emergency Department Patients on Trolleys by Head First Versus Feet First
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Teo, Josephine, RN, INCC, BHSC
P.I. Institution Name:Singapore General Hospital
Contact Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Outram Road, Singapore, 169608, Singapore
Co-Authors:Josephine Teo, Helen Alburque, Joelle Yap and Seah Chin Guan
Purpose: The traditional method of transporting emergency department (ED) patients in Singapore by trolleys is the head first approach. The nurse is at the trolley head to monitor the patient while the porter pushes the trolley from the trolley foot. A few patients have complained of dizziness and disorientation when they were conveyed in this direction. Since no evaluation of the impact of transportation via head first and feet first directions had been reported, the purpose of this study was to determine the nature and incidence of physiological and psychological effects when patients are transported by these two methods, and to utilize the knowledge gained to improve patients' comfort and safety.

Design/Setting: This qualitative-purposive study was conducted in the ED of a tertiary-care hospital in Singapore with 118,000 visits per year.

Sample: Forty adult patients of both genders who were transported by trolleys from the ED to the admitting wards were enrolled in the study. Exclusion criteria included patients who were critically ill or suffered multiple traumas or had altered mental state.

Methodology: The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: head first (n=20) and feet first (n=20). Data were collected using a 4-part questionnaire. Part 1 elicited demographic information and patient's heart rate and oxygen saturation level before transportation. Part 2 elicited information of possible factors that may contribute to physiological and psychological effects, for example, speed of transportation, conversation, position of patient (various prop-up positions versus lying down). Part 3 consisted of closed and opened-ended questions that asked the patients to describe the physical and psychological effects experienced. Part 4 registered patient's heart rate and oxygen saturation level after transportation.

Results:

Head first direction
Physiological effects
Eight (40%) patients experienced physical effects:
Dizziness: 5 (one also had palpitation and generalized physical discomfort)
Nausea: 1
Chest pain: 1
Headache: 1
Negative psychological effects
Fear: 2 (one also experienced loss of sense of direction)

Feet First direction
Physiological effects
Three (15%) patients had physical effects:
Dizziness: 2
Palpitation: 1
Positive psychological effect
One patient reported a sense of well being.

Heart rate and oxygen saturation levels before and after transportation were almost similar in both groups.

Conclusion: The traditional head first method of transporting ED patients may cause greater discomfort than in the feet first position. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransportation of Emergency Department Patients on Trolleys by Head First Versus Feet Firsten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162765-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transportation of Emergency Department Patients on Trolleys by Head First Versus Feet First</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Teo, Josephine, RN, INCC, BHSC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Singapore General Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Emergency Medicine, Outram Road, Singapore, 169608, Singapore</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gaeane@sgh.gov.sq</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Josephine Teo, Helen Alburque, Joelle Yap and Seah Chin Guan</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The traditional method of transporting emergency department (ED) patients in Singapore by trolleys is the head first approach. The nurse is at the trolley head to monitor the patient while the porter pushes the trolley from the trolley foot. A few patients have complained of dizziness and disorientation when they were conveyed in this direction. Since no evaluation of the impact of transportation via head first and feet first directions had been reported, the purpose of this study was to determine the nature and incidence of physiological and psychological effects when patients are transported by these two methods, and to utilize the knowledge gained to improve patients' comfort and safety.<br/><br/>Design/Setting: This qualitative-purposive study was conducted in the ED of a tertiary-care hospital in Singapore with 118,000 visits per year.<br/><br/>Sample: Forty adult patients of both genders who were transported by trolleys from the ED to the admitting wards were enrolled in the study. Exclusion criteria included patients who were critically ill or suffered multiple traumas or had altered mental state.<br/><br/>Methodology: The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: head first (n=20) and feet first (n=20). Data were collected using a 4-part questionnaire. Part 1 elicited demographic information and patient's heart rate and oxygen saturation level before transportation. Part 2 elicited information of possible factors that may contribute to physiological and psychological effects, for example, speed of transportation, conversation, position of patient (various prop-up positions versus lying down). Part 3 consisted of closed and opened-ended questions that asked the patients to describe the physical and psychological effects experienced. Part 4 registered patient's heart rate and oxygen saturation level after transportation.<br/><br/>Results:<br/><br/>Head first direction<br/>Physiological effects<br/>Eight (40%) patients experienced physical effects:<br/>Dizziness: 5 (one also had palpitation and generalized physical discomfort) <br/>Nausea: 1<br/>Chest pain: 1<br/>Headache: 1<br/>Negative psychological effects<br/>Fear: 2 (one also experienced loss of sense of direction)<br/><br/>Feet First direction<br/>Physiological effects<br/>Three (15%) patients had physical effects: <br/>Dizziness: 2<br/>Palpitation: 1<br/>Positive psychological effect<br/>One patient reported a sense of well being.<br/><br/>Heart rate and oxygen saturation levels before and after transportation were almost similar in both groups.<br/><br/>Conclusion: The traditional head first method of transporting ED patients may cause greater discomfort than in the feet first position. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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