2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162772
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence Against Emergency Nurses
Abstract:
Violence Against Emergency Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Gessner, Marjorie, RNC, MSN, CS, SANE
P.I. Institution Name:Milford-Whitinsville Regional Hospital
Contact Address:14 Prospect Street, Milford, MA, 01757, USA
Contact Telephone:(508) 422-2775
Co-Authors:Deanne Dalphond, Erin Giblin, Kamal Hijazzi, and Carol Love
Purpose: To identify the prevalence of violent acts committed against emergency nurses over a six-month period, analyze the types of violence perpetrated against emergency nurses, and examine individual and environmental factors that contribute to the occurrence of violence.

Design: A retrospective, descriptive study utilizing a self-administered mailed Investigator designed questionnaire. Validity and reliability were tested by a panel of ED experts prior to the first nationwide mailing.

Sample: 1000 randomly selected Emergency Nurses Association members (69%) response rate.

Methodology: Anonymous nationwide survey.

Results: Demographics: A profile of the respondents revealed a mean of 16 years in the nursing profession, with 10 years dedicated to the ED. ED staff nurses comprised 76% of the respondents, while 19% functioned in administrative roles, and 5% were advanced practice nurses. Females constituted 88% of the participants.

Assaults: At least one incident of verbal assault was reported by 85% of the respondents. Of those, 39% were committed by patients, 33% by family members, 16% by physicians, and 5% by staff nurses. Physical assault was reported by 31% of the respondents, with 80% of those committed by patients and 16% by family members. Weapons were used in 14% of assaults. Both verbal and physical assaults were reported by 14% of those queried. Not surprisingly, nurses working the evening shift experienced 40% of all assaults. Security personnel were available in 77% of the EDs, with 38% on a part-time basis and 62% present full time. Architectural safety measures such as bullet-proof glass were present in 41% of the EDs, while only 6% had metal detectors. There was a negative correlation between the presence of security and the incidence of violence. Bivariate analysis yielded no difference in the incidence of assault and those who received violence prevention education.

Conclusions: This study has implications for individual safety, nursing education, and work based violence prevention programs. The financial consequences of violence to an institution relating to lost workdays and attrition affects one and all. Improving safety in our workplace must be a priority for Emergency Departments across the nation. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence Against Emergency Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162772-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Violence Against Emergency Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gessner, Marjorie, RNC, MSN, CS, SANE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Milford-Whitinsville Regional Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14 Prospect Street, Milford, MA, 01757, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(508) 422-2775</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marges@mwrh.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deanne Dalphond, Erin Giblin, Kamal Hijazzi, and Carol Love</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To identify the prevalence of violent acts committed against emergency nurses over a six-month period, analyze the types of violence perpetrated against emergency nurses, and examine individual and environmental factors that contribute to the occurrence of violence.<br/><br/>Design: A retrospective, descriptive study utilizing a self-administered mailed Investigator designed questionnaire. Validity and reliability were tested by a panel of ED experts prior to the first nationwide mailing.<br/><br/>Sample: 1000 randomly selected Emergency Nurses Association members (69%) response rate.<br/><br/>Methodology: Anonymous nationwide survey.<br/><br/>Results: Demographics: A profile of the respondents revealed a mean of 16 years in the nursing profession, with 10 years dedicated to the ED. ED staff nurses comprised 76% of the respondents, while 19% functioned in administrative roles, and 5% were advanced practice nurses. Females constituted 88% of the participants.<br/><br/>Assaults: At least one incident of verbal assault was reported by 85% of the respondents. Of those, 39% were committed by patients, 33% by family members, 16% by physicians, and 5% by staff nurses. Physical assault was reported by 31% of the respondents, with 80% of those committed by patients and 16% by family members. Weapons were used in 14% of assaults. Both verbal and physical assaults were reported by 14% of those queried. Not surprisingly, nurses working the evening shift experienced 40% of all assaults. Security personnel were available in 77% of the EDs, with 38% on a part-time basis and 62% present full time. Architectural safety measures such as bullet-proof glass were present in 41% of the EDs, while only 6% had metal detectors. There was a negative correlation between the presence of security and the incidence of violence. Bivariate analysis yielded no difference in the incidence of assault and those who received violence prevention education.<br/><br/>Conclusions: This study has implications for individual safety, nursing education, and work based violence prevention programs. The financial consequences of violence to an institution relating to lost workdays and attrition affects one and all. Improving safety in our workplace must be a priority for Emergency Departments across the nation. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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