2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162774
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Demographic Characteristics of U.S. EDs
Abstract:
Demographic Characteristics of U.S. EDs
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:MacLean, Susan, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Emergency Nurses Association
Contact Address:915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016-6569, USA
Contact Telephone:847-460-4000
Purpose: The ENA National Emergency Department Database was developed in 1995 to provide a sound source of ongoing data to track and anticipate changes in U.S. emergency departments.

Design/Setting/Sample: In 1998, 1,539 emergency department managers responded to a 25-question survey on the characteristics, services, utilization patterns, staffing, administration, and other topics relevant to EDs. EDs in 50 states and the District of Columbia were included in the survey.

Methodology: Data collection forms were scanned and descriptive analysis completed using SPSS. Data were cross-tabulated by the location, facility type, size of the institution, and the number of ED visits.

Results: The results indicated that the greatest number of EDs was located in non-government, not-for-profit community hospitals in rural communities. A little less than two-thirds were part of a health care network affiliation. Most EDs were in small to medium sized institutions reporting inpatient admissions of 1,000 to 10,000 patients per year. The typical ED treated 10,000 to 30,000 patients per year, and admitted less than 20% to the inpatient hospital. About 37% of the EDs were trauma centers. Staffing trends show an increase in hiring RNs and a decrease in downsizing. Waiting time to treatment has decreased slightly for non-urgent patients, remained the same for urgent patients, and increased slightly for emergent patients. Length of stay has remained fairly stable over the past four years with 60% of the emergency patients, 61% of urgent patient, and 80% of non-urgent patients discharged within two hours.

Conclusions: The benchmark data from this study represent care delivery in a large number of EDs. Managers can use this information to compare their ED to a national sample of EDs. The comparative data can be used to identify successes or areas for improvement to provide high quality emergency care. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDemographic Characteristics of U.S. EDsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162774-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Demographic Characteristics of U.S. EDs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">MacLean, Susan, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016-6569, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">847-460-4000</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smaclean@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The ENA National Emergency Department Database was developed in 1995 to provide a sound source of ongoing data to track and anticipate changes in U.S. emergency departments.<br/><br/>Design/Setting/Sample: In 1998, 1,539 emergency department managers responded to a 25-question survey on the characteristics, services, utilization patterns, staffing, administration, and other topics relevant to EDs. EDs in 50 states and the District of Columbia were included in the survey.<br/><br/>Methodology: Data collection forms were scanned and descriptive analysis completed using SPSS. Data were cross-tabulated by the location, facility type, size of the institution, and the number of ED visits.<br/><br/>Results: The results indicated that the greatest number of EDs was located in non-government, not-for-profit community hospitals in rural communities. A little less than two-thirds were part of a health care network affiliation. Most EDs were in small to medium sized institutions reporting inpatient admissions of 1,000 to 10,000 patients per year. The typical ED treated 10,000 to 30,000 patients per year, and admitted less than 20% to the inpatient hospital. About 37% of the EDs were trauma centers. Staffing trends show an increase in hiring RNs and a decrease in downsizing. Waiting time to treatment has decreased slightly for non-urgent patients, remained the same for urgent patients, and increased slightly for emergent patients. Length of stay has remained fairly stable over the past four years with 60% of the emergency patients, 61% of urgent patient, and 80% of non-urgent patients discharged within two hours.<br/><br/>Conclusions: The benchmark data from this study represent care delivery in a large number of EDs. Managers can use this information to compare their ED to a national sample of EDs. The comparative data can be used to identify successes or areas for improvement to provide high quality emergency care. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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