Emergency Department Staff Members' Knowledge and Use of Complementary Therapies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162775
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Department Staff Members' Knowledge and Use of Complementary Therapies
Abstract:
Emergency Department Staff Members' Knowledge and Use of Complementary Therapies
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Snyder, Audrey
P.I. Institution Name:University of Virginia School of Nursing
Contact Address:McLeod Hall, Charlottesville, VA, 22903, USA
Co-Authors:Ann Gill Taylor, Yu Shen Lin, and Kim Eggleston
Purpose: Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) among persons living in the United States has continued to increase over the past decade. However, frequency of use of these therapies in the emergency department (ED) setting is unknown. The purpose of this survey study was to explore ED practitionersÆ personal use of CATs and the recommendation of selected therapies to patients.

Design: An exploratory survey was used to determine ED practitionersÆ self-use of CATs and their recommendation of selected therapies for patient intervention.

Setting and sample: A sample of staff in 10 EDs located in Virginia, Florida, and Washington, D.C. where the authors had cooperative clinical agreements for graduate student placement was used. An investigator-constructed survey was mailed to nurse managers or nursing specialists who had agreed to participate for distribution to clinical personnel in their departments. Four hundred eighty questionnaires were mailed with 142 returned for a 30% response rate. Respondents included physicians (11%), nurse practitioners (3%), nurses (78%), and other health care professionals (7%).

Methodology: The three areas surveyed were self-reported use of CATs, staff recommendations to patients, and general knowledge of these therapies Questions addressed 24 therapies asking respondents to indicate whether they had used the therapy, the length of use, and perceived effectiveness for themselves on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Respondents were also asked if each therapy was used or recommended in their practice. Descriptive statistics including frequencies, percentages, means, and ranges were calculated.

Results: ED practitioners reported back rub/massage (85%), music (78.9%), and prayer or spiritual practice (65.5%) as the three most frequently used CATs to promote their own well-being. The three CATs recommended most often to patients were massage (60%), prayer or spiritual practices (46%), and group support (43%). ED practitioners (70%) expressed interest in acquiring additional knowledge of CATs and support for integration of evidence-based CATs in EDs.

Conclusions: Use of CATs for personal well being and as recommended interventions for patients by ED practitioners in the south east region is limited. Most ED staff are not familiar with many CATs, but acknowledged their limited knowledge and skills regarding CATs. Findings suggest that ED nurses would like additional training and better referral networks for CATs. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department Staff Members' Knowledge and Use of Complementary Therapiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162775-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Department Staff Members' Knowledge and Use of Complementary Therapies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Snyder, Audrey</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Virginia School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">McLeod Hall, Charlottesville, VA, 22903, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann Gill Taylor, Yu Shen Lin, and Kim Eggleston</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) among persons living in the United States has continued to increase over the past decade. However, frequency of use of these therapies in the emergency department (ED) setting is unknown. The purpose of this survey study was to explore ED practitioners&AElig; personal use of CATs and the recommendation of selected therapies to patients.<br/><br/>Design: An exploratory survey was used to determine ED practitioners&AElig; self-use of CATs and their recommendation of selected therapies for patient intervention.<br/><br/>Setting and sample: A sample of staff in 10 EDs located in Virginia, Florida, and Washington, D.C. where the authors had cooperative clinical agreements for graduate student placement was used. An investigator-constructed survey was mailed to nurse managers or nursing specialists who had agreed to participate for distribution to clinical personnel in their departments. Four hundred eighty questionnaires were mailed with 142 returned for a 30% response rate. Respondents included physicians (11%), nurse practitioners (3%), nurses (78%), and other health care professionals (7%).<br/><br/>Methodology: The three areas surveyed were self-reported use of CATs, staff recommendations to patients, and general knowledge of these therapies Questions addressed 24 therapies asking respondents to indicate whether they had used the therapy, the length of use, and perceived effectiveness for themselves on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Respondents were also asked if each therapy was used or recommended in their practice. Descriptive statistics including frequencies, percentages, means, and ranges were calculated.<br/><br/>Results: ED practitioners reported back rub/massage (85%), music (78.9%), and prayer or spiritual practice (65.5%) as the three most frequently used CATs to promote their own well-being. The three CATs recommended most often to patients were massage (60%), prayer or spiritual practices (46%), and group support (43%). ED practitioners (70%) expressed interest in acquiring additional knowledge of CATs and support for integration of evidence-based CATs in EDs.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Use of CATs for personal well being and as recommended interventions for patients by ED practitioners in the south east region is limited. Most ED staff are not familiar with many CATs, but acknowledged their limited knowledge and skills regarding CATs. Findings suggest that ED nurses would like additional training and better referral networks for CATs. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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