2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162776
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Written Report as a Tool to Decrease Length of Stay
Abstract:
Written Report as a Tool to Decrease Length of Stay
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2000
Author:Venturella, Joanne, RN, BA
P.I. Institution Name:St. Agnes Healthcare
Contact Address:900 Caton Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21229, USA
Co-Authors:Llyern Bartholomew and Michael A. Silverman
Purpose: Delay in moving admitted patients from the ED [Emergency Department to inpatient beds results in increased LOS (length of stay)]. This in turn causes a delay in moving patients from the waiting room to the treatment area and increased time spent on ambulance reroute. Problems encountered in giving a telephoned nursing report to the inpatient unit were identified. The use of a written report was explored as a possible solution.

Design: Descriptive design using the pre and post trial measures: the time of bed assignment, the time report was given, and the time the patient left the ED. These parameters were used to measure the effectiveness of the written report. A survey was used to assess satisfaction of the nursing staff.

Settings: The study was conducted in a 407 bed community teaching hospital with a 37 bed level II Emergency Department. The ED sees an average of 164 patients/day averaging 30 admissions/day or 52% of total hospital admissions.

Sample: Retrospective chart review of all ED admissions for the first week of each month. Satisfaction survey involved a convenient sample of nurses on the inpatient units and in the ED.

Methodology: The initial pilot was done with one inpatient unit. After two months, evaluation was made based on the success criteria. Form revisions were made based on suggestions and the pilot moved on to two additional units. After one month the process was again evaluated against the success criteria. The use of the written report was then extended to all medical-surgical units. The report is presently used for all med-surg and telemetry units. Verbal report is still used in the critical care areas.

Results: The time from admission bed assignment to patient leaving the Emergency Department has decreased from 46 minutes to 23 minutes in the 10 months since the program began. In addition, both the Emergency Department and unit nurses report significantly decreased time spent on the phone thus freeing them up for patient care.

Conclusions: The written report as a refined tool conveys all the information for a smooth transition from the Emergency Department to the Inpatient unit. It has been effective as an integral part of an initiative to decrease ED length of stay for admitted patients. In addition, both the ED and inpatient nurses report significantly decreased time spent on the phone thus freeing them up for patient care. Inpatient nurses express that the revised tool has become a concise, accurate, and consistent report that is helpful for the admission workup. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWritten Report as a Tool to Decrease Length of Stayen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162776-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Written Report as a Tool to Decrease Length of Stay</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Venturella, Joanne, RN, BA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Agnes Healthcare</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">900 Caton Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21229, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Llyern Bartholomew and Michael A. Silverman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Delay in moving admitted patients from the ED [Emergency Department to inpatient beds results in increased LOS (length of stay)]. This in turn causes a delay in moving patients from the waiting room to the treatment area and increased time spent on ambulance reroute. Problems encountered in giving a telephoned nursing report to the inpatient unit were identified. The use of a written report was explored as a possible solution.<br/><br/>Design: Descriptive design using the pre and post trial measures: the time of bed assignment, the time report was given, and the time the patient left the ED. These parameters were used to measure the effectiveness of the written report. A survey was used to assess satisfaction of the nursing staff.<br/><br/>Settings: The study was conducted in a 407 bed community teaching hospital with a 37 bed level II Emergency Department. The ED sees an average of 164 patients/day averaging 30 admissions/day or 52% of total hospital admissions.<br/><br/>Sample: Retrospective chart review of all ED admissions for the first week of each month. Satisfaction survey involved a convenient sample of nurses on the inpatient units and in the ED.<br/><br/>Methodology: The initial pilot was done with one inpatient unit. After two months, evaluation was made based on the success criteria. Form revisions were made based on suggestions and the pilot moved on to two additional units. After one month the process was again evaluated against the success criteria. The use of the written report was then extended to all medical-surgical units. The report is presently used for all med-surg and telemetry units. Verbal report is still used in the critical care areas.<br/><br/>Results: The time from admission bed assignment to patient leaving the Emergency Department has decreased from 46 minutes to 23 minutes in the 10 months since the program began. In addition, both the Emergency Department and unit nurses report significantly decreased time spent on the phone thus freeing them up for patient care.<br/><br/>Conclusions: The written report as a refined tool conveys all the information for a smooth transition from the Emergency Department to the Inpatient unit. It has been effective as an integral part of an initiative to decrease ED length of stay for admitted patients. In addition, both the ED and inpatient nurses report significantly decreased time spent on the phone thus freeing them up for patient care. Inpatient nurses express that the revised tool has become a concise, accurate, and consistent report that is helpful for the admission workup. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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