2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162777
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Triage Time Standards
Abstract:
Triage Time Standards
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Travers, Debbie, RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina
Title:Debbie Travers
Contact Address:CB 7594, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA
Contact Telephone:(919) 843-0309
Co-Authors:Anna Waller
Objectives: Upon viewing this poster, the participant will be able to: 1) describe the study purpose; 2) define the term "triage time standard"; and 3) describe the factor(s) that significantly influenced triage time in the study.

Purpose: Emergency departments are under increasing pressures to operate efficiently, and many are tracking length of stay, time to physician, and triage time as markers for ED performance. Triage time standards vary. ENA calls for assessments to be completed in five minutes or less. Although the standard is two minutes at the study site, actual triage time has been difficult to measure with existing computer systems and personnel. The study purpose was to measure actual triage time and to identify associated factors.

Setting and Sample: The study was conducted at a level I trauma center ED serving urban and rural clients. A stratified random sample of day, evening and night shift triage assessments were observed between March 23, 1998, and April 5, 1998. Triage assessments on ambulance patients were excluded.

Methodology: Researchers performed prospective, direct observations of triage, using a stratified sample of 16 two-hour blocks to control for variations in time of day, day of week, and nurse shifts. Triage data included start/stop times, age, acuity, chief complaint, which (if any) vital signs were obtained, and treatment area (Acute ED, Minor Trauma, Urgent Care, Pediatrics). Triage nurse data included nursing experience, certifications and frequency of triage shifts.

Results: There were 262 triage assessments by 16 nurses observed over 10 days. Mean triage time was 3.3 minutes with most between 2 to 4 minutes. Vital signs were obtained during 150 of the assessments (mean time 3.9 minutes). Mean age of all study patients was 31, ranging from 0.2 to 83 years. For patients with vitals, the mean age was 37. There was a positive correlation between time and patient age for all patients, as well as among only those who had vitals taken (r=.38, p=.0001). There was a weak negative correlation between time and years of nursing experience (r=.20, p=.0018). There were no significant time differences for acuity, treatment area, nurse certifications or triage frequency.

Conclusions: With only 22% of the triage assessments meeting the standard, changes in practice or standards are needed. Further research is in progress to evaluate whether vitals are necessary to make an appropriate triage decision. Longer time standards for elderly patients are under consideration. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTriage Time Standardsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162777-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Triage Time Standards</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Travers, Debbie, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Debbie Travers</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CB 7594, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(919) 843-0309</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dtravers@med.unc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anna Waller</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: Upon viewing this poster, the participant will be able to: 1) describe the study purpose; 2) define the term &quot;triage time standard&quot;; and 3) describe the factor(s) that significantly influenced triage time in the study.<br/><br/>Purpose: Emergency departments are under increasing pressures to operate efficiently, and many are tracking length of stay, time to physician, and triage time as markers for ED performance. Triage time standards vary. ENA calls for assessments to be completed in five minutes or less. Although the standard is two minutes at the study site, actual triage time has been difficult to measure with existing computer systems and personnel. The study purpose was to measure actual triage time and to identify associated factors.<br/><br/>Setting and Sample: The study was conducted at a level I trauma center ED serving urban and rural clients. A stratified random sample of day, evening and night shift triage assessments were observed between March 23, 1998, and April 5, 1998. Triage assessments on ambulance patients were excluded.<br/><br/>Methodology: Researchers performed prospective, direct observations of triage, using a stratified sample of 16 two-hour blocks to control for variations in time of day, day of week, and nurse shifts. Triage data included start/stop times, age, acuity, chief complaint, which (if any) vital signs were obtained, and treatment area (Acute ED, Minor Trauma, Urgent Care, Pediatrics). Triage nurse data included nursing experience, certifications and frequency of triage shifts.<br/><br/>Results: There were 262 triage assessments by 16 nurses observed over 10 days. Mean triage time was 3.3 minutes with most between 2 to 4 minutes. Vital signs were obtained during 150 of the assessments (mean time 3.9 minutes). Mean age of all study patients was 31, ranging from 0.2 to 83 years. For patients with vitals, the mean age was 37. There was a positive correlation between time and patient age for all patients, as well as among only those who had vitals taken (r=.38, p=.0001). There was a weak negative correlation between time and years of nursing experience (r=.20, p=.0018). There were no significant time differences for acuity, treatment area, nurse certifications or triage frequency.<br/><br/>Conclusions: With only 22% of the triage assessments meeting the standard, changes in practice or standards are needed. Further research is in progress to evaluate whether vitals are necessary to make an appropriate triage decision. Longer time standards for elderly patients are under consideration. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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