2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162778
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sources of Stress Among Emergency Nurses in a Community Hospital
Abstract:
Sources of Stress Among Emergency Nurses in a Community Hospital
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1998
Author:Bartholomew, Llyem L., RN, CEN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Agnes Hospital
Contact Address:, Baltimore, MD, USA
Co-Authors:Margaret A. McEntee, RN, PhD, CPC, BCETS
Purpose: Many changes in the health care system have occurred since Burns, Kiriloff and Close identified the greatest sources of stress among emergency department (ED) nurses in 1983. The purpose of this study was to identify the primary stressors and responses among ED nurses using the Lazarus and Folkman Stress, Appraisal and Coping Model.

Design: A descriptive design was used.

Setting: The study was conducted in a 37-bed Level II ED of a community teaching hospital with 55,000+ visits per year.

Methodology: A two-part questionnaire was distributed by internal mail. Part I elicited demographic information, perceptions of the level of stress, and the occurrence of selected psychophysiological conditions. Part II elicited descriptions of the two most stressful incidents in the month prior to the survey and the cognitions, emotions, and behavioral responses to the incidents.

Results: Headaches and difficulty sleeping were reported by 50% and 45% of the respondents, respectively, with multiple responses by several nurses. Sixty-five percent of the respondents rated the usual level of stress at a seven (1-10 scale). The top stressful incidents were categorized as Unit Management (40%) followed by Patient Care (28%) and Interpersonal (23%). The cognitive responses reflected negative appraisals of the situations. Frustration (30%) and anger (12%) were the most frequently reported emotions. In 23% of the situations the respondents took direct action to resolve the issue.

Conclusions: Unit Management, Patient Care and Interpersonal situations remained the top stressors for this group of ED nurses. Frustration, anger, and the infrequent use of direct actions to resolve situations may indicate a sense of powerlessness and/or the lack of skills to effect change. The ED nurses, the Department of Nursing, and the Hospital Education Department could develop the process and training programs to address these issues. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSources of Stress Among Emergency Nurses in a Community Hospitalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162778-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sources of Stress Among Emergency Nurses in a Community Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bartholomew, Llyem L., RN, CEN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Agnes Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Baltimore, MD, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret A. McEntee, RN, PhD, CPC, BCETS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Many changes in the health care system have occurred since Burns, Kiriloff and Close identified the greatest sources of stress among emergency department (ED) nurses in 1983. The purpose of this study was to identify the primary stressors and responses among ED nurses using the Lazarus and Folkman Stress, Appraisal and Coping Model.<br/><br/>Design: A descriptive design was used.<br/><br/>Setting: The study was conducted in a 37-bed Level II ED of a community teaching hospital with 55,000+ visits per year.<br/><br/>Methodology: A two-part questionnaire was distributed by internal mail. Part I elicited demographic information, perceptions of the level of stress, and the occurrence of selected psychophysiological conditions. Part II elicited descriptions of the two most stressful incidents in the month prior to the survey and the cognitions, emotions, and behavioral responses to the incidents.<br/><br/>Results: Headaches and difficulty sleeping were reported by 50% and 45% of the respondents, respectively, with multiple responses by several nurses. Sixty-five percent of the respondents rated the usual level of stress at a seven (1-10 scale). The top stressful incidents were categorized as Unit Management (40%) followed by Patient Care (28%) and Interpersonal (23%). The cognitive responses reflected negative appraisals of the situations. Frustration (30%) and anger (12%) were the most frequently reported emotions. In 23% of the situations the respondents took direct action to resolve the issue.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Unit Management, Patient Care and Interpersonal situations remained the top stressors for this group of ED nurses. Frustration, anger, and the infrequent use of direct actions to resolve situations may indicate a sense of powerlessness and/or the lack of skills to effect change. The ED nurses, the Department of Nursing, and the Hospital Education Department could develop the process and training programs to address these issues. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:33:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:33:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.