2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162779
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Glasgow Coma Scale: Implementing a Standard of Care
Abstract:
The Glasgow Coma Scale: Implementing a Standard of Care
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1998
Author:Broering, Beth, RN, MSN, CEN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Carolina Medical Center
Contact Address:, Charlotte, NC, USA
Co-Authors:Beth Martin, RN, CNRN, CCRN and Tammy Schena, RN, BSN, CCRN
Clinical Topic: The Glasgow Coma Scale is a tool developed to objectively assess levels of consciousness and coma using the patient's eye-opening, verbal, and motor responses. The score is used in treatment algorithms for patient management, as a variable in research activities, and in outcomes prediction. Therefore, it is essential to have accurate and consistent methods of assessing and scoring a patient's level of consciousness. At our institution, we found much variability in the assessment and scoring of patients, particularly those patients who were intubated or pharmacologically paralyzed. The purpose of this project was to develop and implement a standardized method of assessment and scoring of the Glasgow Coma Scale.

Implementation: A multi-disciplinary committee was formed, including representatives from both the adult and pediatric emergency and critical care areas of our institution. After a thorough review of the literature, standards of assessment and scoring were developed. These standards were presented and approved by Neurological Services, Trauma Services, Emergency Services, and Critical Care Committees. Staff education included a pretest, interactive group discussion using case scenarios, and a post-test. Unit-based preceptor champions were identified to provide continued education and evaluation. A self-learning module and a videotape are being developed for ongoing Staff education. Quality improvement monitoring post implementation will include bedside audits of the nurses' assessments of a patient's score against a standard, expert observer.

Outcomes: Our goals for standardization of assigning a Glasgow Coma Scale score include: (a) improved and consistent assessment of patients' levels of consciousness; (b) improved communication between nursing staff and physicians; (c) multi-disciplinary implementation of the standards on a hospital-wide basis; and (d) providing a standard scoring method for our trauma registry as well as trauma registries throughout the state.

Recommendations: Recommendations for clinical practice include: (a) periodic review by current nursing staff using the videotape and self-learning module; (b) implementation of the standards on a system-wide basis; and (c) further research on the standards for assessment of the Glasgow Coma Scale. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Glasgow Coma Scale: Implementing a Standard of Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162779-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Glasgow Coma Scale: Implementing a Standard of Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Broering, Beth, RN, MSN, CEN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Carolina Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Charlotte, NC, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beth Martin, RN, CNRN, CCRN and Tammy Schena, RN, BSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The Glasgow Coma Scale is a tool developed to objectively assess levels of consciousness and coma using the patient's eye-opening, verbal, and motor responses. The score is used in treatment algorithms for patient management, as a variable in research activities, and in outcomes prediction. Therefore, it is essential to have accurate and consistent methods of assessing and scoring a patient's level of consciousness. At our institution, we found much variability in the assessment and scoring of patients, particularly those patients who were intubated or pharmacologically paralyzed. The purpose of this project was to develop and implement a standardized method of assessment and scoring of the Glasgow Coma Scale.<br/><br/>Implementation: A multi-disciplinary committee was formed, including representatives from both the adult and pediatric emergency and critical care areas of our institution. After a thorough review of the literature, standards of assessment and scoring were developed. These standards were presented and approved by Neurological Services, Trauma Services, Emergency Services, and Critical Care Committees. Staff education included a pretest, interactive group discussion using case scenarios, and a post-test. Unit-based preceptor champions were identified to provide continued education and evaluation. A self-learning module and a videotape are being developed for ongoing Staff education. Quality improvement monitoring post implementation will include bedside audits of the nurses' assessments of a patient's score against a standard, expert observer.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Our goals for standardization of assigning a Glasgow Coma Scale score include: (a) improved and consistent assessment of patients' levels of consciousness; (b) improved communication between nursing staff and physicians; (c) multi-disciplinary implementation of the standards on a hospital-wide basis; and (d) providing a standard scoring method for our trauma registry as well as trauma registries throughout the state.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Recommendations for clinical practice include: (a) periodic review by current nursing staff using the videotape and self-learning module; (b) implementation of the standards on a system-wide basis; and (c) further research on the standards for assessment of the Glasgow Coma Scale. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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