2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162783
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers to Nurse Practitioners in Navy Emergency Departments
Abstract:
Barriers to Nurse Practitioners in Navy Emergency Departments
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1998
Author:Galvin, Andrew A., RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:U.S. Navy
Contact Address:NROTCU Houston, Houston, TX, USA
Purpose: Although there are no official positions for nurse practitioners (NP) in Navy emergency departments, the health care contribution of NPs in this setting could be considerable. Unknown at present is whether any barriers exist to NP practice in these settings. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify perceived barriers to their practice. Elias and Deal's problem-solving model was used as the conceptual framework for this study.

Design/Sample: This descriptive study was completed by a convenience sample of 105 Navy physicians and nurses who worked in U.S. Navy Hospitals with EDs. They were selected based on their knowledge, insight, and influence in the staffing patterns of Navy EDs.

Methodology: A 49-item questionnaire developed from a review of the literature was distributed by mail to respondents and returned using a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Respondents reported their level of agreement to 30 items, and rated their confidence level in the NPs' ability to complete 19 specific tasks. They were then asked if they believed that these tasks represented a barrier to NPs in Navy EDs.

Data/Results: Descriptive statistics were used to assess agreement for the first 30 items. A cross-tabulation between confidence level and perceived barrier was utilized for the remainder of the survey. Seven items were reported to be barriers by more than 50% of respondents. Two tasks were identified as barriers by more than 50% of respondents.

Conclusions: With barriers identified, steps may be taken to overcome them. If these barriers are overcome, the benefits of NP utilization in Navy emergency departments may be realized. According to recent literature, the growing popularity and increased utilization of NPs in civilian EDs has resulted in increased cost effectiveness and documentation, decreased lengths of stay, increased patient satisfaction, and greater access to care. If the military takes advantage of this NP role, they may realize these same benefits. The military health care system faces many of the same challenges as its civilian counterparts. The implementation of NPs in their EDs may be one way to confront and master these crises. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers to Nurse Practitioners in Navy Emergency Departmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162783-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers to Nurse Practitioners in Navy Emergency Departments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Galvin, Andrew A., RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U.S. Navy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">NROTCU Houston, Houston, TX, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Although there are no official positions for nurse practitioners (NP) in Navy emergency departments, the health care contribution of NPs in this setting could be considerable. Unknown at present is whether any barriers exist to NP practice in these settings. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify perceived barriers to their practice. Elias and Deal's problem-solving model was used as the conceptual framework for this study.<br/><br/>Design/Sample: This descriptive study was completed by a convenience sample of 105 Navy physicians and nurses who worked in U.S. Navy Hospitals with EDs. They were selected based on their knowledge, insight, and influence in the staffing patterns of Navy EDs.<br/><br/>Methodology: A 49-item questionnaire developed from a review of the literature was distributed by mail to respondents and returned using a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Respondents reported their level of agreement to 30 items, and rated their confidence level in the NPs' ability to complete 19 specific tasks. They were then asked if they believed that these tasks represented a barrier to NPs in Navy EDs.<br/><br/>Data/Results: Descriptive statistics were used to assess agreement for the first 30 items. A cross-tabulation between confidence level and perceived barrier was utilized for the remainder of the survey. Seven items were reported to be barriers by more than 50% of respondents. Two tasks were identified as barriers by more than 50% of respondents.<br/><br/>Conclusions: With barriers identified, steps may be taken to overcome them. If these barriers are overcome, the benefits of NP utilization in Navy emergency departments may be realized. According to recent literature, the growing popularity and increased utilization of NPs in civilian EDs has resulted in increased cost effectiveness and documentation, decreased lengths of stay, increased patient satisfaction, and greater access to care. If the military takes advantage of this NP role, they may realize these same benefits. The military health care system faces many of the same challenges as its civilian counterparts. The implementation of NPs in their EDs may be one way to confront and master these crises. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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