Emergency Staff Perspectives on Violence and Personal Safety in the Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162788
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Staff Perspectives on Violence and Personal Safety in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Emergency Staff Perspectives on Violence and Personal Safety in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1998
Author:Presley, Diane, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Medical Center
Contact Address:, Austin, TX, USA
Purpose: Assault and violence are recognized as significant occupational hazards for emergency health care professionals. This study will assess emergency staff perspectives on violence and personal safety in the workplace.

Design/Setting: Developed by Poster and Ryan (1986), this exploratory, descriptive study survey was conducted with staff who work in emergency departments (EDs) throughout Austin, Texas.

Method: A convenience sample was obtained from EDs during staff meetings (N=101). Staff, which included nurses, clinical assistants, and social workers, were questioned regarding perspectives on violence and personal safety in the ED. The survey consists of two sections: (a) characteristics of the ED staff, number of assaults, education in preventing aggressive behavior, and personal safety, and (b) reflections on issues when assault occurs.

Results: The demographic profile showed that 75% of respondents were ages 30-39; 72% worked in combined adult/child settings; 80% were female; 68% worked in the emergency field for 2-5 years and 28% 5-10 years; and 60% worked day/evening shifts. Sixty-three percent reported being assaulted 1 to 3 times in their emergency career. Ten percent reported being assaulted more than ten times, and 68% reported the most recent assault occurred in the last six months. When asked if the incident was reported, 70% did not, but interestingly, 89% disagreed with the statement that nurses who are assaulted and have minor injuries should not report incidents. Only 51% of the respondents said they attended a course on preventing and managing assault behavior, with 64% reporting that they could expect to be assaulted during their career. When asked about safety concerns, 94% disagreed that it was unacceptable for staff to protect themselves. Eighty-eight percent agreed staffing patterns and physical environment were not adequate to prevent assaults. However, 80% noted they feel safe most of the time at work.

Conclusion: It is recommended that courses be provided to assist staff to recognize and defuse dangers. Personnel safety should be an annual core competency for the ED. Response plans, staff support programs, and maintaining satisfactory work environments must become a priority in the workplace. [Scientific Assembly Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Staff Perspectives on Violence and Personal Safety in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162788-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Staff Perspectives on Violence and Personal Safety in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Presley, Diane, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Austin, TX, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Assault and violence are recognized as significant occupational hazards for emergency health care professionals. This study will assess emergency staff perspectives on violence and personal safety in the workplace.<br/><br/>Design/Setting: Developed by Poster and Ryan (1986), this exploratory, descriptive study survey was conducted with staff who work in emergency departments (EDs) throughout Austin, Texas.<br/><br/>Method: A convenience sample was obtained from EDs during staff meetings (N=101). Staff, which included nurses, clinical assistants, and social workers, were questioned regarding perspectives on violence and personal safety in the ED. The survey consists of two sections: (a) characteristics of the ED staff, number of assaults, education in preventing aggressive behavior, and personal safety, and (b) reflections on issues when assault occurs.<br/><br/>Results: The demographic profile showed that 75% of respondents were ages 30-39; 72% worked in combined adult/child settings; 80% were female; 68% worked in the emergency field for 2-5 years and 28% 5-10 years; and 60% worked day/evening shifts. Sixty-three percent reported being assaulted 1 to 3 times in their emergency career. Ten percent reported being assaulted more than ten times, and 68% reported the most recent assault occurred in the last six months. When asked if the incident was reported, 70% did not, but interestingly, 89% disagreed with the statement that nurses who are assaulted and have minor injuries should not report incidents. Only 51% of the respondents said they attended a course on preventing and managing assault behavior, with 64% reporting that they could expect to be assaulted during their career. When asked about safety concerns, 94% disagreed that it was unacceptable for staff to protect themselves. Eighty-eight percent agreed staffing patterns and physical environment were not adequate to prevent assaults. However, 80% noted they feel safe most of the time at work.<br/><br/>Conclusion: It is recommended that courses be provided to assist staff to recognize and defuse dangers. Personnel safety should be an annual core competency for the ED. Response plans, staff support programs, and maintaining satisfactory work environments must become a priority in the workplace. [Scientific Assembly Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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