2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162790
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Telephone Health: Burden for Emergency Room Nurses?
Abstract:
Telephone Health: Burden for Emergency Room Nurses?
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1998
Author:Schappe, Anne, RN, MSN, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Webster University, Nursing Department
Contact Address:, St. Louis, MO, USA
Co-Authors:Cindy Fife, RN, MSN
Purpose: Emergency department (ED) nurses are frequently asked to answer telephone calls about patients' symptoms and give health care advice over the telephone. To free ED nurses from having to answer phone calls, a Midwestern pediatric hospital set up a service whereby trained pediatric telephone triage nurses using written protocols take all calls that previously went to the ED, in addition to calls from the community at large. The purpose of this study was to look at the most frequently asked questions and the disposition of the calls over a six-month period (November 1996 - April 1997).

Design: A retrospective descriptive design was used.

Setting/Sample: The study was conducted in a 235-bed Midwestern pediatric hospital. The sample consisted of 21,945 telephone calls taken during the six-month study period.

Methodology: Data were gathered from computer-generated numbers and individual typed records of phone calls received. Data were analyzed for the total number of calls, the most frequent calls, and the disposition of the calls.

Results: A total of 21,945 calls were received during the 6-month study period. T he most frequent calls were for fever in children three months and older (12.8%), cold and cough (11.8%), nausea and vomiting (10.25%), chicken pox (6.25%), diarrhea (5.32%), rash (5.16%), abnormal stools and constipation (4.14%), head and neck trauma (3.8%). Calls were received for other concerns with less frequency. The callers were given the following advice: call 911 (0.5%), take the child to the ED (2.3%), call a primary care provider within one hour (16.5%), call a primary care provider during office hours (27.6%), care for child at home with instructions given (44.6%), and health information provided (8.5%).

Conclusion: In this study, more than half of the calls received were for concerns where the child could be cared for at home or by calling the primary care provider in the office. Telephone triage departments provide a way to relieve ED nurses of providing health care information over the telephone. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTelephone Health: Burden for Emergency Room Nurses?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162790-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Telephone Health: Burden for Emergency Room Nurses?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schappe, Anne, RN, MSN, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Webster University, Nursing Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, St. Louis, MO, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindy Fife, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Emergency department (ED) nurses are frequently asked to answer telephone calls about patients' symptoms and give health care advice over the telephone. To free ED nurses from having to answer phone calls, a Midwestern pediatric hospital set up a service whereby trained pediatric telephone triage nurses using written protocols take all calls that previously went to the ED, in addition to calls from the community at large. The purpose of this study was to look at the most frequently asked questions and the disposition of the calls over a six-month period (November 1996 - April 1997).<br/><br/>Design: A retrospective descriptive design was used.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: The study was conducted in a 235-bed Midwestern pediatric hospital. The sample consisted of 21,945 telephone calls taken during the six-month study period.<br/><br/>Methodology: Data were gathered from computer-generated numbers and individual typed records of phone calls received. Data were analyzed for the total number of calls, the most frequent calls, and the disposition of the calls.<br/><br/>Results: A total of 21,945 calls were received during the 6-month study period. T he most frequent calls were for fever in children three months and older (12.8%), cold and cough (11.8%), nausea and vomiting (10.25%), chicken pox (6.25%), diarrhea (5.32%), rash (5.16%), abnormal stools and constipation (4.14%), head and neck trauma (3.8%). Calls were received for other concerns with less frequency. The callers were given the following advice: call 911 (0.5%), take the child to the ED (2.3%), call a primary care provider within one hour (16.5%), call a primary care provider during office hours (27.6%), care for child at home with instructions given (44.6%), and health information provided (8.5%).<br/><br/>Conclusion: In this study, more than half of the calls received were for concerns where the child could be cared for at home or by calling the primary care provider in the office. Telephone triage departments provide a way to relieve ED nurses of providing health care information over the telephone. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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