2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162791
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analysis of Return Visits to a Pediatric Emergency Department Within 72 Hours
Abstract:
Analysis of Return Visits to a Pediatric Emergency Department Within 72 Hours
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1998
Author:Shearman, Victoria, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital Medical Center
Contact Address:, Cincinnati, OH, USA
Co-Authors:Todd Martin, RN; Christa Windle, RN; Colleen Scott, RN; Mary Klug, RN; Debi Inman, RN; Gloria Graham, RN; and Patricia Bender, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the most common causes underlying a patient's return to a pediatric emergency department (ED) within 72 hours. Several studies of this kind have been done within the adult population. However, a literature review revealed no studies were done regarding the pediatric population.

Design: A retrospective, observational study utilizing review of medical records was conducted.

Sample/Setting: All patients who returned to an urban, teaching, level I pediatric trauma center ED during the study time period, were included in the sample.

Methodology: The medical records of patients with two visits to the ED within 72 hours were collected on a quarterly basis, covering April 1997 to April 1998. Demographic data were collected. In addition, three ED nurses independently audited the charts. A standardized set of definitions was utilized to identify the reason(s) for the return visit(s). Consensus by at least two nurses was required to list the reason for the repeat visit.

Results: The most frequent specific reasons for return were: patient was instructed to return, parental or patient anxiety, progression of the disease, a new problem arose, and habitual use of the ED. In addition, it was noted that return visits for the purpose of treatment of minor illness accounted for half of all return visits.

Conclusions: In order to promote appropriate use of an ED, it is important to first identify the causes of repeat visits. This study revealed that anxiety and habitual use of the ED are common reasons for the repetitive visits. Creative education strategies are needed to: (a) decrease the number of patients that return for anxiety and/or habitual use of the ED for minor illnesses, (b) improve parentsÆ knowledge and abilities to manage illness at home, and (c) improve parental knowledge of disease progression and appropriate reasons for repetitive ED evaluation. [Scientific Assembly Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnalysis of Return Visits to a Pediatric Emergency Department Within 72 Hoursen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162791-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Analysis of Return Visits to a Pediatric Emergency Department Within 72 Hours</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shearman, Victoria, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Cincinnati, OH, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Todd Martin, RN; Christa Windle, RN; Colleen Scott, RN; Mary Klug, RN; Debi Inman, RN; Gloria Graham, RN; and Patricia Bender, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the most common causes underlying a patient's return to a pediatric emergency department (ED) within 72 hours. Several studies of this kind have been done within the adult population. However, a literature review revealed no studies were done regarding the pediatric population.<br/><br/>Design: A retrospective, observational study utilizing review of medical records was conducted.<br/><br/>Sample/Setting: All patients who returned to an urban, teaching, level I pediatric trauma center ED during the study time period, were included in the sample.<br/><br/>Methodology: The medical records of patients with two visits to the ED within 72 hours were collected on a quarterly basis, covering April 1997 to April 1998. Demographic data were collected. In addition, three ED nurses independently audited the charts. A standardized set of definitions was utilized to identify the reason(s) for the return visit(s). Consensus by at least two nurses was required to list the reason for the repeat visit. <br/><br/>Results: The most frequent specific reasons for return were: patient was instructed to return, parental or patient anxiety, progression of the disease, a new problem arose, and habitual use of the ED. In addition, it was noted that return visits for the purpose of treatment of minor illness accounted for half of all return visits.<br/><br/>Conclusions: In order to promote appropriate use of an ED, it is important to first identify the causes of repeat visits. This study revealed that anxiety and habitual use of the ED are common reasons for the repetitive visits. Creative education strategies are needed to: (a) decrease the number of patients that return for anxiety and/or habitual use of the ED for minor illnesses, (b) improve parents&AElig; knowledge and abilities to manage illness at home, and (c) improve parental knowledge of disease progression and appropriate reasons for repetitive ED evaluation. [Scientific Assembly Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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