2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162794
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Computers: Managing Culture Change
Abstract:
Computers: Managing Culture Change
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1998
Author:Travers, Debbie, RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Title:Research Instructor
Contact Address:, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA
Co-Authors:Tracy Partham, RN, MSN
Purpose: This study analyzed the effectiveness of change strategies employed during the implementation of an ED computer tracking system. The transition to automation represented a major cultural change for the staff, and change theory guided this proactive approach to managing the implementation.

Design: Implementation analysis.

Setting/Sample: All 50 RN staff (79% female, mean age 37) at a tertiary, urban, university ED, 53 beds, 60,000 visits/year, participated in the study.

Methodology: During pre-implementation, a series of change strategies and training initiatives were employed, including: (1) staff nurse input in system development (2) regular staff updates, (3) train-the-trainer mentor program, (4) PC course for computer-phobic individuals (N=7), and (5) customized training plans.

Pre-intervention, all ED RN staff were asked to complete Computer Attitudes and Beliefs Surveys (CABS), and Computer Training Needs Assessments (CTNA). Instruments were developed for the study based on change and adult learning literature. Content validity was established via item review by the 3 project team nurses. Post-intervention, participants were re-surveyed using CABS. Computer competencies, computer utilization assessments, staff turnover rates, and potential negative clinical events related to the computer were also examined.

Results: Pre-intervention, the CABS return rate was 56% (28 nurses). About 30% of the respondents reported that computers were not easy to use, and 21% said computers required excellent typing. The pre-training CTNA response was 100% (50 nurses); only half used PCs to access patient information, none had experience with the mainframe application that would support the new ED system, 22% had no experience with a mouse, and 10% didn't type.

Post-intervention, 50% (25 nurses) completed the CABS; only one nurse believed computers were not easy to use, and 12% still thought computers required excellent typing skills. Post-training, all 50 nurses successfully demonstrated computer competency. Post-implementation, 100% were proficient in using the mainframe-based system daily. No staff turnover, patient complaints or negative clinical events have occurred due to nurses' computer usage.

Conclusions: Automation was facilitated by comprehensive change and training plans, and supports the need for managers to utilize change theory when computerizing manual processes. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComputers: Managing Culture Changeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162794-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Computers: Managing Culture Change</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Travers, Debbie, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina School of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tracy Partham, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study analyzed the effectiveness of change strategies employed during the implementation of an ED computer tracking system. The transition to automation represented a major cultural change for the staff, and change theory guided this proactive approach to managing the implementation.<br/><br/>Design: Implementation analysis.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: All 50 RN staff (79% female, mean age 37) at a tertiary, urban, university ED, 53 beds, 60,000 visits/year, participated in the study.<br/><br/>Methodology: During pre-implementation, a series of change strategies and training initiatives were employed, including: (1) staff nurse input in system development (2) regular staff updates, (3) train-the-trainer mentor program, (4) PC course for computer-phobic individuals (N=7), and (5) customized training plans.<br/><br/>Pre-intervention, all ED RN staff were asked to complete Computer Attitudes and Beliefs Surveys (CABS), and Computer Training Needs Assessments (CTNA). Instruments were developed for the study based on change and adult learning literature. Content validity was established via item review by the 3 project team nurses. Post-intervention, participants were re-surveyed using CABS. Computer competencies, computer utilization assessments, staff turnover rates, and potential negative clinical events related to the computer were also examined.<br/><br/>Results: Pre-intervention, the CABS return rate was 56% (28 nurses). About 30% of the respondents reported that computers were not easy to use, and 21% said computers required excellent typing. The pre-training CTNA response was 100% (50 nurses); only half used PCs to access patient information, none had experience with the mainframe application that would support the new ED system, 22% had no experience with a mouse, and 10% didn't type.<br/><br/>Post-intervention, 50% (25 nurses) completed the CABS; only one nurse believed computers were not easy to use, and 12% still thought computers required excellent typing skills. Post-training, all 50 nurses successfully demonstrated computer competency. Post-implementation, 100% were proficient in using the mainframe-based system daily. No staff turnover, patient complaints or negative clinical events have occurred due to nurses' computer usage.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Automation was facilitated by comprehensive change and training plans, and supports the need for managers to utilize change theory when computerizing manual processes. [Leadership Challenge - Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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