Identifying the Roles, Activities, Skills, and the Cost-Saving and Revenue-Generating Activities of Masters Prepared Nurses Who Function in Traditional Clinical Nurse Specialist Roles in the United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162795
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying the Roles, Activities, Skills, and the Cost-Saving and Revenue-Generating Activities of Masters Prepared Nurses Who Function in Traditional Clinical Nurse Specialist Roles in the United States
Abstract:
Identifying the Roles, Activities, Skills, and the Cost-Saving and Revenue-Generating Activities of Masters Prepared Nurses Who Function in Traditional Clinical Nurse Specialist Roles in the United States
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Adams Scott, Rhonda
P.I. Institution Name:South Fulton Medical Center
Contact Address:1170 Cleveland Avenue, Atlanta, GA, 30344, USA
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the roles, activities, skills, and the cost-saving and revenue-generating activities of masters prepared nurses who function in traditional clinical nurse specialist roles in the United States.

Methodology: The study used a descriptive research design and was guided by Role Theory. The data were measured by a 64-item instrument developed by the principal investigator, using Likert-type, fill-in-the blank, and closed-ended questions. The tool was pretested and used in two pilot studies. Content validity was supported by three experienced CNSs. Instrument reliability was 0.89. Surveys were mailed to all individuals who subscribed (n=2,279) to the Clinical Nurse Specialist Journal. The sample included 724 masters prepared CNSs providing a margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points with a 99% confidence level.

Results: Respondents were from 49 states and represented 25 clinical specialties. The majority of the CNSs were female, between the ages of 30-49, worked full time, earned $40,000-$60,000, active in professional organizations, hospital based, and employed 1-8 years. Respondents reported (listed from frequently to less frequently) spending time in the role of expert practitioner, educator, consultant, administrator, and researcher.

The results indicated a trend towards increasing administrative responsibilities and performing advanced skills that have traditionally been considered medical practice. A small number of CNSs were able to identify cost-saving and revenue generating activities, including the monetary value.

Conclusions: Implications from this study can be used to (1) identify and clarify roles, activities, and advanced skills, (2) recognize all CNSs as advanced practice nurses, (3) recommend the educational preparation, curriculum changes, and clinical experiences needed to prepare CNSs and (4) conduct research regarding the effects of CNSs' interventions on nursing practice, patient care, and health care costs. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying the Roles, Activities, Skills, and the Cost-Saving and Revenue-Generating Activities of Masters Prepared Nurses Who Function in Traditional Clinical Nurse Specialist Roles in the United Statesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162795-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title"> Identifying the Roles, Activities, Skills, and the Cost-Saving and Revenue-Generating Activities of Masters Prepared Nurses Who Function in Traditional Clinical Nurse Specialist Roles in the United States</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adams Scott, Rhonda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Fulton Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1170 Cleveland Avenue, Atlanta, GA, 30344, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the roles, activities, skills, and the cost-saving and revenue-generating activities of masters prepared nurses who function in traditional clinical nurse specialist roles in the United States.<br/><br/>Methodology: The study used a descriptive research design and was guided by Role Theory. The data were measured by a 64-item instrument developed by the principal investigator, using Likert-type, fill-in-the blank, and closed-ended questions. The tool was pretested and used in two pilot studies. Content validity was supported by three experienced CNSs. Instrument reliability was 0.89. Surveys were mailed to all individuals who subscribed (n=2,279) to the Clinical Nurse Specialist Journal. The sample included 724 masters prepared CNSs providing a margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points with a 99% confidence level.<br/><br/>Results: Respondents were from 49 states and represented 25 clinical specialties. The majority of the CNSs were female, between the ages of 30-49, worked full time, earned $40,000-$60,000, active in professional organizations, hospital based, and employed 1-8 years. Respondents reported (listed from frequently to less frequently) spending time in the role of expert practitioner, educator, consultant, administrator, and researcher.<br/><br/>The results indicated a trend towards increasing administrative responsibilities and performing advanced skills that have traditionally been considered medical practice. A small number of CNSs were able to identify cost-saving and revenue generating activities, including the monetary value.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Implications from this study can be used to (1) identify and clarify roles, activities, and advanced skills, (2) recognize all CNSs as advanced practice nurses, (3) recommend the educational preparation, curriculum changes, and clinical experiences needed to prepare CNSs and (4) conduct research regarding the effects of CNSs' interventions on nursing practice, patient care, and health care costs. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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