2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162797
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Sledding Injuries in Pennsylvania
Abstract:
Pediatric Sledding Injuries in Pennsylvania
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Bernardo, Lisa
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing
Contact Address:415 Victo, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA
Co-Authors:Mary Jane Gardner and Kenneth Rogers
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze demographic and other factors associated with pediatric sledding injuries. Application of the agent-host-environment model of injury prevention was applied to this study's findings to develop education strategies for preventing pediatric sledding injuries.

Design: A retrospective, descriptive review of registry data from the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study (PTOS).

Setting: Accredited trauma centers in Pennsylvania.

Sample: Injured children ages 2 to 18 years (mean = 10.6 years, +/-3.9) admitted to the 25 accredited Pennsylvania trauma centers from 1989 through 1994 whose E-codes and injury descriptions indicated sledding activities.

Methodology: PTOS data elements extracted for analysis were age, gender, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS) and discharge status. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and ICD-9-CM codes were obtained. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed.

Results: Two hundred twenty-six patients were admitted for sledding injuries. Sixty-nine percent were male. The mean ICU LOS was 3 days +/- 2.9, and the mean hospital LOS was 7 days +/- 7.2. Ninety-six percent were discharged alive. Forty-seven percent of the ISS scores were classified as moderate (ISS 7-15). There was no association between age and ISS (r=0.04), but there was a moderate correlation between ISS and length of ICU stay (r=0.47). Hitting trees and stationary objects (n=121) was the most common injury descriptor. Patients struck by moving vehicles (n=18) had the highest proportion of head (34%) and chest (18%) injuries, the highest mortality rate (33%), the highest median ISS score (22) and highest mean ICU LOS (6 days), compared to patients hitting stationary objects or falling.

Conclusions: Most children were injured from collisions with objects or moving vehicles. Patient education based on the agent-host-environment triad of injury prevention should emphasize the safe sledding practices of sledding obstacle-free hills with adult supervision and avoidance of sledding in streets or driveways. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Sledding Injuries in Pennsylvaniaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162797-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pediatric Sledding Injuries in Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernardo, Lisa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">415 Victo, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Jane Gardner and Kenneth Rogers</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze demographic and other factors associated with pediatric sledding injuries. Application of the agent-host-environment model of injury prevention was applied to this study's findings to develop education strategies for preventing pediatric sledding injuries.<br/><br/>Design: A retrospective, descriptive review of registry data from the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study (PTOS).<br/><br/>Setting: Accredited trauma centers in Pennsylvania.<br/><br/>Sample: Injured children ages 2 to 18 years (mean = 10.6 years, +/-3.9) admitted to the 25 accredited Pennsylvania trauma centers from 1989 through 1994 whose E-codes and injury descriptions indicated sledding activities.<br/><br/>Methodology: PTOS data elements extracted for analysis were age, gender, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS) and discharge status. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and ICD-9-CM codes were obtained. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed.<br/><br/>Results: Two hundred twenty-six patients were admitted for sledding injuries. Sixty-nine percent were male. The mean ICU LOS was 3 days +/- 2.9, and the mean hospital LOS was 7 days +/- 7.2. Ninety-six percent were discharged alive. Forty-seven percent of the ISS scores were classified as moderate (ISS 7-15). There was no association between age and ISS (r=0.04), but there was a moderate correlation between ISS and length of ICU stay (r=0.47). Hitting trees and stationary objects (n=121) was the most common injury descriptor. Patients struck by moving vehicles (n=18) had the highest proportion of head (34%) and chest (18%) injuries, the highest mortality rate (33%), the highest median ISS score (22) and highest mean ICU LOS (6 days), compared to patients hitting stationary objects or falling.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Most children were injured from collisions with objects or moving vehicles. Patient education based on the agent-host-environment triad of injury prevention should emphasize the safe sledding practices of sledding obstacle-free hills with adult supervision and avoidance of sledding in streets or driveways. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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