2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162800
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Post-Code Stress in Emergency Nurses
Abstract:
Post-Code Stress in Emergency Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Catalano, Janine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas - Houston, Medical School
Contact Address:1100 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX, 77030, USA
Purpose: Stress in emergency nurses may lead to physical and psychological symptoms and increased turnover. Role theory states that stress occurs when one feels unable to meet internal or external behavioral expectations. For emergency nurses, CPR situations may produce feelings that expectations have not been met resulting in post-code stress. The purpose of this study was to measure post-code stress and identify demographic variables that affect it.

Design, Setting & Sample: This descriptive study occurred in four emergency departments with visits ranging from 1,700 to 3,500 per month. A sample of convenience consisted of 53 nurses who reported anonymously. Females composed 81% of the sample with a mean age of 39.7 years (SD=7.5). The majority reported a BSN with an average of 8 years emergency nursing experience (SD=5.6). Religious beliefs were important or very important to 71% of the respondents. Subjects had participated in an average of 23 codes in the past year (SD=16).

Methodology: The Post-code Stress Scale (PCSS) (Cole et al., 1991) and demographic data forms were distributed at a scheduled staff meeting. Respondents returned the forms anonymously by U.S. mail. The response rate was 60%. The PCSS has evidence of content and construct validity and an internal consistency of 0.84 in this sample.

Results: Scores on the PCSS had a mean of 68 and a range of 37 to 83. Possible scores are 18 to 90, with higher scores indicating higher levels of post-code stress. Of all the possible demographic variables, only religious beliefs were found to have an influence as determined by ANOVA [F(3,48)=3.14, p<.05]. Subjects who reported that religious beliefs were "very important" to them demonstrated higher levels of post-code stress.

Conclusion: High levels of post-code stress were found in this population and scores were greater than 67 for 58% of participants. Thus, post-code stress is a significant phenomenon of concern to nursing. Post-code stress, not properly diffused, may lead to a variety of undesirable outcomes for nurses, emergency departments and, ultimately patient care. Implications for emergency nurses include the need for nurses to be aware of stress engendered by codes and the need for a mechanism to diffuse this stress. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePost-Code Stress in Emergency Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162800-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Post-Code Stress in Emergency Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Catalano, Janine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas - Houston, Medical School</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1100 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX, 77030, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Stress in emergency nurses may lead to physical and psychological symptoms and increased turnover. Role theory states that stress occurs when one feels unable to meet internal or external behavioral expectations. For emergency nurses, CPR situations may produce feelings that expectations have not been met resulting in post-code stress. The purpose of this study was to measure post-code stress and identify demographic variables that affect it.<br/><br/>Design, Setting &amp; Sample: This descriptive study occurred in four emergency departments with visits ranging from 1,700 to 3,500 per month. A sample of convenience consisted of 53 nurses who reported anonymously. Females composed 81% of the sample with a mean age of 39.7 years (SD=7.5). The majority reported a BSN with an average of 8 years emergency nursing experience (SD=5.6). Religious beliefs were important or very important to 71% of the respondents. Subjects had participated in an average of 23 codes in the past year (SD=16).<br/><br/>Methodology: The Post-code Stress Scale (PCSS) (Cole et al., 1991) and demographic data forms were distributed at a scheduled staff meeting. Respondents returned the forms anonymously by U.S. mail. The response rate was 60%. The PCSS has evidence of content and construct validity and an internal consistency of 0.84 in this sample.<br/><br/>Results: Scores on the PCSS had a mean of 68 and a range of 37 to 83. Possible scores are 18 to 90, with higher scores indicating higher levels of post-code stress. Of all the possible demographic variables, only religious beliefs were found to have an influence as determined by ANOVA [F(3,48)=3.14, p&lt;.05]. Subjects who reported that religious beliefs were &quot;very important&quot; to them demonstrated higher levels of post-code stress.<br/><br/>Conclusion: High levels of post-code stress were found in this population and scores were greater than 67 for 58% of participants. Thus, post-code stress is a significant phenomenon of concern to nursing. Post-code stress, not properly diffused, may lead to a variety of undesirable outcomes for nurses, emergency departments and, ultimately patient care. Implications for emergency nurses include the need for nurses to be aware of stress engendered by codes and the need for a mechanism to diffuse this stress. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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