2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162802
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes Toward AIDS and Perceived Climate
Abstract:
Attitudes Toward AIDS and Perceived Climate
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Cole, Frank
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas - Houston, School of Nursing
Contact Address:1100 Holcombe Blvd., Fifth Floor, Houston, TX, 77030, USA
Co-Authors:Cindy Abel
Purpose: Nurses attitudes toward AIDS (AA) are known to impact care provided to persons with AIDS (PWAs); however, little research exists in this area with ED nurses. The conceptual framework indicates that AA and the perceived climate toward providing care to PWAs impacts outcomes of care. Therefore, this study examined the relationships among AA, perceived climate, and demographic variables.

Design: A cross-sectional, correlational design was used.

Setting: Two level 1 trauma centers with a large number of PWAs in Southern urban areas were used.

Sample: The convenience sample consisted of 66 registered nurses, the majority were female (n=47), married (n=38), with a mean age of 36 and either an associate degree (n=30) or BSN (n=26). No exclusion criteria were used.

Methodology: A questionnaire was used that contained demographic questions, an AA scale with established reliability (.80-.96) and validity and an AIDS Climate (AC) scale. The AA scale measured attitude according to the mode (heterosexual, blood transfusion (blood), IV drug use (IV), and homosexual) by which the patient acquired AIDS. The AC scale, constructed for this project, measured nurses' perception that administration supported care to PWAs.

Results: Cronbach's alpha was .95, .96, .84, .90, for heterosexual, blood, IV, and homosexual subscales, respectively, and .70 for AC. Evidence of factorial validity was obtained. The following mean scores existed for heterosexual, 17.6; blood, 18.3; homosexual, 16.1; and IV, 11.7; and 31.6 (possible 7 -42) for AC. Using Pearson Product-Moment Correlations, no significant relationships existed between AA subscales and AC or between AA and demographics. AC was related only to perceived risk of AIDS (.27, p=.03).

Conclusions: AA varied by mode of acquiring HIV with the most positive attitude for blood. Administrative support existed to provide care and perceived support was greater for those who felt less risk of contracting HIV. Additional research is needed to examine the effects of AA and AC on outcomes of care. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes Toward AIDS and Perceived Climateen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162802-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes Toward AIDS and Perceived Climate</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cole, Frank</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas - Houston, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1100 Holcombe Blvd., Fifth Floor, Houston, TX, 77030, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindy Abel</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Nurses attitudes toward AIDS (AA) are known to impact care provided to persons with AIDS (PWAs); however, little research exists in this area with ED nurses. The conceptual framework indicates that AA and the perceived climate toward providing care to PWAs impacts outcomes of care. Therefore, this study examined the relationships among AA, perceived climate, and demographic variables.<br/><br/>Design: A cross-sectional, correlational design was used.<br/><br/>Setting: Two level 1 trauma centers with a large number of PWAs in Southern urban areas were used.<br/><br/>Sample: The convenience sample consisted of 66 registered nurses, the majority were female (n=47), married (n=38), with a mean age of 36 and either an associate degree (n=30) or BSN (n=26). No exclusion criteria were used.<br/><br/>Methodology: A questionnaire was used that contained demographic questions, an AA scale with established reliability (.80-.96) and validity and an AIDS Climate (AC) scale. The AA scale measured attitude according to the mode (heterosexual, blood transfusion (blood), IV drug use (IV), and homosexual) by which the patient acquired AIDS. The AC scale, constructed for this project, measured nurses' perception that administration supported care to PWAs.<br/><br/>Results: Cronbach's alpha was .95, .96, .84, .90, for heterosexual, blood, IV, and homosexual subscales, respectively, and .70 for AC. Evidence of factorial validity was obtained. The following mean scores existed for heterosexual, 17.6; blood, 18.3; homosexual, 16.1; and IV, 11.7; and 31.6 (possible 7 -42) for AC. Using Pearson Product-Moment Correlations, no significant relationships existed between AA subscales and AC or between AA and demographics. AC was related only to perceived risk of AIDS (.27, p=.03).<br/><br/>Conclusions: AA varied by mode of acquiring HIV with the most positive attitude for blood. Administrative support existed to provide care and perceived support was greater for those who felt less risk of contracting HIV. Additional research is needed to examine the effects of AA and AC on outcomes of care. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.