2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162808
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Enhancement of Access and Care for Trauma Patients
Abstract:
Rural Enhancement of Access and Care for Trauma Patients
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Gough, Sallie
P.I. Institution Name:Eastern Carolina Injury Prevention Program
Contact Address:P.O. Box 6028, Greenville, NC, 27834, USA
Co-Authors:Herbert Garrison, Kathleen Dunn, and Paul Cunningham
Purpose: The Rural Preventable Mortality Study (RPMS) conducted in 1995 in rural eastern North Carolina suggested that approximately 29% of deaths due to trauma were preventable. Primary concerns in the prehospital setting included airway management, oxygenation/ventilation, and fluid resuscitation. Major ED issues include delays in definitive care, airway management, and oxygenation/ventilation. The purpose of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) funded Rural Enhancement of Access and Care for Trauma (REACT) project is to decrease the preventable mortality rate in trauma through implementation of a continuous quality improvement system.

Design: Descriptive.

Setting: Twenty-Nine counties in rural eastern North Carolina served by one Level One Trauma Center.

Sample: Participants include ED nurses, physicians, and prehospital care providers of all levels in the twenty-nine county area of eastern North Carolina.

Methodology: Trauma care guidelines were developed based on the RPMS-identified deficiencies. Tools developed for the collection of data assessing prehospital and ED care were used in a pilot study to determine reliability. A system is being implemented consisting of education directed at ED and prehospital care providers; data collection assessing the quality of trauma care, and feedback based on the data collected. Community ED nursing staff will assess prehospital trauma care, and Level One Trauma Center personnel will assess care delivered at outlying EDs. Concurrent education and data collection with feedback to the care providers will be conducted from July 1, 1997, through June 30, 1998. Beginning July 1, 1998, the Rural Preventable Mortality Study will be repeated to assess the effectiveness of this continuous quality improvement system on preventable mortality outcomes.

Results: Preliminary data on trauma care guideline compliance will be presented.

Conclusions: The REACT project provides an opportunity to test outcomes after instituting a model system for continuously improving trauma care. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Enhancement of Access and Care for Trauma Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162808-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural Enhancement of Access and Care for Trauma Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gough, Sallie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Eastern Carolina Injury Prevention Program</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O. Box 6028, Greenville, NC, 27834, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Herbert Garrison, Kathleen Dunn, and Paul Cunningham</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The Rural Preventable Mortality Study (RPMS) conducted in 1995 in rural eastern North Carolina suggested that approximately 29% of deaths due to trauma were preventable. Primary concerns in the prehospital setting included airway management, oxygenation/ventilation, and fluid resuscitation. Major ED issues include delays in definitive care, airway management, and oxygenation/ventilation. The purpose of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) funded Rural Enhancement of Access and Care for Trauma (REACT) project is to decrease the preventable mortality rate in trauma through implementation of a continuous quality improvement system.<br/><br/>Design: Descriptive.<br/><br/>Setting: Twenty-Nine counties in rural eastern North Carolina served by one Level One Trauma Center.<br/><br/>Sample: Participants include ED nurses, physicians, and prehospital care providers of all levels in the twenty-nine county area of eastern North Carolina.<br/><br/>Methodology: Trauma care guidelines were developed based on the RPMS-identified deficiencies. Tools developed for the collection of data assessing prehospital and ED care were used in a pilot study to determine reliability. A system is being implemented consisting of education directed at ED and prehospital care providers; data collection assessing the quality of trauma care, and feedback based on the data collected. Community ED nursing staff will assess prehospital trauma care, and Level One Trauma Center personnel will assess care delivered at outlying EDs. Concurrent education and data collection with feedback to the care providers will be conducted from July 1, 1997, through June 30, 1998. Beginning July 1, 1998, the Rural Preventable Mortality Study will be repeated to assess the effectiveness of this continuous quality improvement system on preventable mortality outcomes.<br/><br/>Results: Preliminary data on trauma care guideline compliance will be presented.<br/><br/>Conclusions: The REACT project provides an opportunity to test outcomes after instituting a model system for continuously improving trauma care. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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