2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162812
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Pulse Oximetry in Smokers
Abstract:
Evaluation of Pulse Oximetry in Smokers
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Miller, Julie
P.I. Institution Name:St. Luke's Pediatric Hospital
Contact Address:, Bellevue, KY, 41073, USA
Co-Authors:Arthur Pancioli
Purpose: To determine the accuracy of pulse oximetry in persons who smoke presenting to the ED for evaluation. Recently, spectrophotometric analysis and bedside use of pulse oximetry to monitor patientsÆ arterial oxygenation has become a standard of care in the ED. However, in persons who smoke, elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels may result in erroneous pulse oximetry readings.

Sample: A convenience sample of 21 adults aged 18 to 78 years who presented to the ED for evaluation was used in this pilot study. Patients requiring pulse oximetry and concurrent arterial blood gas were included. Exclusion criteria were: recent or current oxygen therapy, pulse oximetry saturation less than 70%, shock, methemoglobinemia, and hemoglobin less than 5g/100ml. Based upon current smoking history, 10 subjects were assigned to the smoker group and 11 subjects were assigned to the non-smoking group. Subject confidentiality and anonymity were assured following IRB approval.

Methodology: Pulse oximetry was measured using a Nellcor N-200 oximeter (Nellcor Incorporated, Hayward, California). Co-oximetry, which measures absorbencies of oxyhemoglobin, is considered the ôgold standardö for establishing pulse oximeter accuracy. Reliability and validity of pulse oximetry when correlated with co-oximetry analysis is r+.98. Comparison analysis on the arterial blood sample was performed using OSM 3 Hemoximeter (Copenhagen, Denmark). Carboxyhemoglobin levels, obtained as part of the co-oximetry analysis, were utilized to confirm smoking status.

Results: A strong, statistically significant relationship between pulse oximetry and co-oximetry measurements in non-smokers (r=.87, p=.001; mean difference 1.7%, SD of difference +/- 1.6%) was demonstrated. However, in smokers, the relationship was moderate and non-significant (r=.47, p=.172; mean difference 2.1%, SD of difference +/-2.2%).

Conclusions: Although sample size was small, the data suggested that pulse oximetry is a more accurate reflection of arterial oxygenation in non-smokers than in smokers. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Pulse Oximetry in Smokersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162812-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Pulse Oximetry in Smokers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Julie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Luke's Pediatric Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Bellevue, KY, 41073, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arthur Pancioli</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To determine the accuracy of pulse oximetry in persons who smoke presenting to the ED for evaluation. Recently, spectrophotometric analysis and bedside use of pulse oximetry to monitor patients&AElig; arterial oxygenation has become a standard of care in the ED. However, in persons who smoke, elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels may result in erroneous pulse oximetry readings.<br/><br/>Sample: A convenience sample of 21 adults aged 18 to 78 years who presented to the ED for evaluation was used in this pilot study. Patients requiring pulse oximetry and concurrent arterial blood gas were included. Exclusion criteria were: recent or current oxygen therapy, pulse oximetry saturation less than 70%, shock, methemoglobinemia, and hemoglobin less than 5g/100ml. Based upon current smoking history, 10 subjects were assigned to the smoker group and 11 subjects were assigned to the non-smoking group. Subject confidentiality and anonymity were assured following IRB approval.<br/><br/>Methodology: Pulse oximetry was measured using a Nellcor N-200 oximeter (Nellcor Incorporated, Hayward, California). Co-oximetry, which measures absorbencies of oxyhemoglobin, is considered the &ocirc;gold standard&ouml; for establishing pulse oximeter accuracy. Reliability and validity of pulse oximetry when correlated with co-oximetry analysis is r+.98. Comparison analysis on the arterial blood sample was performed using OSM 3 Hemoximeter (Copenhagen, Denmark). Carboxyhemoglobin levels, obtained as part of the co-oximetry analysis, were utilized to confirm smoking status.<br/><br/>Results: A strong, statistically significant relationship between pulse oximetry and co-oximetry measurements in non-smokers (r=.87, p=.001; mean difference 1.7%, SD of difference +/- 1.6%) was demonstrated. However, in smokers, the relationship was moderate and non-significant (r=.47, p=.172; mean difference 2.1%, SD of difference +/-2.2%).<br/><br/>Conclusions: Although sample size was small, the data suggested that pulse oximetry is a more accurate reflection of arterial oxygenation in non-smokers than in smokers. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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