2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162813
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hidden Scars: Experiences with Practicing Procedures on the Newly Dead
Abstract:
Hidden Scars: Experiences with Practicing Procedures on the Newly Dead
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Oman, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:University Hospital
Contact Address:4200 East Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO, 80262, USA
Purpose: Teaching hospitals have the mission and responsibility to teach, train, and educate health care providers. Life saving invasive procedures are taught and practiced in order to develop and maintain competency. In some instances, these procedures are taught and practiced on newly dead patients. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the health care providerÆs experience with the phenomenon of practicing procedures on the newly dead in the Emergency Department (ED).

Design, Setting and Sample: Human science provided the framework for this qualitative descriptive study conducted in the ED and associated flights program. Eight consenting participants consisting of four nurses, three physicians, and one hospital minister (chosen with the intent of obtaining a non-clinical opinion) were selected based on their personal range of experience, their views about the phenomenon, and their willingness to be interviewed.

Methodology: Unstructured interviews lasting 30-50 minutes began with the question, "I'd like you to tell me about your experience with practicing or teaching medical procedures on newly dead patients in the ED." The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed to uncover themes. Participants were asked to validate the results to establish credibility and confirmability.

Results: Four major themes emerged from the data: 1) The Real Thing: the reality of practicing on a human body versus a manikin or animal model; 2) Moral Conflict: the issue of consent and the lack of respect and dignity that was perceived during the practicing; 3) Secrecy: not disclosing the practice and misrepresenting the procedures in the medical record; 4) Hidden Scars: procedures that won't disfigure the patient are more tolerable.

Conclusions: Practicing procedures on the newly dead without consent or disclosure is advocated by some emergency care providers as necessary for assuring and maintaining competency. Others find this "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" practice (Goldblatt, 1985) troublesome. We need to find a way to eliminate the secrecy, acknowledge what we do and deal with the issue of consent. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHidden Scars: Experiences with Practicing Procedures on the Newly Deaden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162813-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hidden Scars: Experiences with Practicing Procedures on the Newly Dead</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Oman, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4200 East Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO, 80262, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Teaching hospitals have the mission and responsibility to teach, train, and educate health care providers. Life saving invasive procedures are taught and practiced in order to develop and maintain competency. In some instances, these procedures are taught and practiced on newly dead patients. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the health care provider&AElig;s experience with the phenomenon of practicing procedures on the newly dead in the Emergency Department (ED).<br/><br/>Design, Setting and Sample: Human science provided the framework for this qualitative descriptive study conducted in the ED and associated flights program. Eight consenting participants consisting of four nurses, three physicians, and one hospital minister (chosen with the intent of obtaining a non-clinical opinion) were selected based on their personal range of experience, their views about the phenomenon, and their willingness to be interviewed.<br/><br/>Methodology: Unstructured interviews lasting 30-50 minutes began with the question, &quot;I'd like you to tell me about your experience with practicing or teaching medical procedures on newly dead patients in the ED.&quot; The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed to uncover themes. Participants were asked to validate the results to establish credibility and confirmability.<br/><br/>Results: Four major themes emerged from the data: 1) The Real Thing: the reality of practicing on a human body versus a manikin or animal model; 2) Moral Conflict: the issue of consent and the lack of respect and dignity that was perceived during the practicing; 3) Secrecy: not disclosing the practice and misrepresenting the procedures in the medical record; 4) Hidden Scars: procedures that won't disfigure the patient are more tolerable.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Practicing procedures on the newly dead without consent or disclosure is advocated by some emergency care providers as necessary for assuring and maintaining competency. Others find this &quot;Don't Ask, Don't Tell&quot; practice (Goldblatt, 1985) troublesome. We need to find a way to eliminate the secrecy, acknowledge what we do and deal with the issue of consent. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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