2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162815
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Delay in Accessing Stroke Healthcare (Dash) Study
Abstract:
Delay in Accessing Stroke Healthcare (Dash) Study
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Rosamund, Wayne
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina
Contact Address:School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC, 27514, USA
Co-Authors:Rebecca Gorton, Dexter Morris, Albert Hinn, and Susan Hohenhaus
Purpose: Delay in Accessing Stroke Healthcare (DASH) Study was designed to quantify components of delay in responding to stroke symptoms and to identify factors associated with short delay in presenting to the Emergency Department.

Design: A longitudinal prospective study design was used.

Setting & Sample: ED nursing staff, who attended training sessions given by the study investigators, identified patients presenting to the ED of the University of North Carolina Hospitals with any of the following symptoms of stroke: sudden weakness or numbness of face, arm, or leg on one side of the body, sudden dimness or loss of vision, loss of speech, or sudden severe headache, or unexplained dizziness. Men and women of any age were eligible. Between July 1995 and February 1996, 152 patients were enrolled.

Methods: A 32 question, standardized, structured investigator-developed questionnaire was administered by trained ED nurses to every patient with stroke symptoms. The data collected included time of onset of symptoms, actions taken in response to symptoms and perceived urgency of symptoms. To obtain consent validity, the tool was reviewed by a panel of expert emergency nurses.

Results: More than 50% of study participants were women, 33% were African-American, with an average age of 67 years. Having someone else in their surroundings identify stroke symptoms (47%), having known someone who had a stroke (70%), and the use of an ambulance to arrive at the ED (52%) were associated with ED arrival times within 3 hours of onset of symptoms. Having a history of stroke (37%) and making the decision to seek medical care themselves (24%) were associated with a greater than 3 hour delay to arrival in the ED.

Conclusion: The importance of a"ôstroke-educated" public to reduce the time it takes for patients experiencing stroke to rapidly respond and access medical care is needed for the benefits of evolving acute treatments to be more fully achieved. Emergency nurses, as well as the public, should be actively involved in educating high-risk patients and families about stroke recognition. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDelay in Accessing Stroke Healthcare (Dash) Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162815-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Delay in Accessing Stroke Healthcare (Dash) Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rosamund, Wayne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC, 27514, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rebecca Gorton, Dexter Morris, Albert Hinn, and Susan Hohenhaus</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Delay in Accessing Stroke Healthcare (DASH) Study was designed to quantify components of delay in responding to stroke symptoms and to identify factors associated with short delay in presenting to the Emergency Department.<br/><br/>Design: A longitudinal prospective study design was used.<br/><br/>Setting &amp; Sample: ED nursing staff, who attended training sessions given by the study investigators, identified patients presenting to the ED of the University of North Carolina Hospitals with any of the following symptoms of stroke: sudden weakness or numbness of face, arm, or leg on one side of the body, sudden dimness or loss of vision, loss of speech, or sudden severe headache, or unexplained dizziness. Men and women of any age were eligible. Between July 1995 and February 1996, 152 patients were enrolled.<br/><br/>Methods: A 32 question, standardized, structured investigator-developed questionnaire was administered by trained ED nurses to every patient with stroke symptoms. The data collected included time of onset of symptoms, actions taken in response to symptoms and perceived urgency of symptoms. To obtain consent validity, the tool was reviewed by a panel of expert emergency nurses.<br/><br/>Results: More than 50% of study participants were women, 33% were African-American, with an average age of 67 years. Having someone else in their surroundings identify stroke symptoms (47%), having known someone who had a stroke (70%), and the use of an ambulance to arrive at the ED (52%) were associated with ED arrival times within 3 hours of onset of symptoms. Having a history of stroke (37%) and making the decision to seek medical care themselves (24%) were associated with a greater than 3 hour delay to arrival in the ED.<br/><br/>Conclusion: The importance of a&quot;&ocirc;stroke-educated&quot; public to reduce the time it takes for patients experiencing stroke to rapidly respond and access medical care is needed for the benefits of evolving acute treatments to be more fully achieved. Emergency nurses, as well as the public, should be actively involved in educating high-risk patients and families about stroke recognition. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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