Evaluation of the Use of an Emergency Department Domestic Violence Protocol and its Association with the Attitudes, Knowledge and Skills of Clinicians

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162817
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of the Use of an Emergency Department Domestic Violence Protocol and its Association with the Attitudes, Knowledge and Skills of Clinicians
Abstract:
Evaluation of the Use of an Emergency Department Domestic Violence Protocol and its Association with the Attitudes, Knowledge and Skills of Clinicians
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Smith, Kristen
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina Hospitals
Contact Address:Department of Emergency Medicine - CB#7594, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA
Co-Authors:Anna Waller and Susan Hohenhaus
Purpose: In recent years, domestic violence has been in the spotlight as a major public health issue. As part of the evaluation of a Domestic Violence protocol, this study, utilizing the framework of social-learning theory, looked at the relationships between the implementation of the protocol, and the knowledge, attitudes and screening/referral skills of ED clinicians.

Design: A comparative design was used to conduct this study.

Setting & Sample: 34 ED clinicians (nurses and physicians) at the University of North Carolina Hospitals, a tertiary care and teaching facility, were surveyed prior to the implementation of a domestic violence protocol and after one year of its use.

Methods: A self-administered questionnaire developed by experts in domestic violence issues, consisting of closed ended questions regarding attitudes and knowledge and open ended questions regarding screening and referral skills was used. The evaluators attempted to survey every clinician. Clinicians were educated about domestic violence issues and trained to use the protocol. To assess screening and referral skills, clinicians were asked what they do when they suspect and confirm a woman to be a domestic violence victim. Pre and post survey data were analyzed using Students T-test for continuous variables and chi-square tests for categorical variables.

Results: High comfort levels regarding talking to patients about domestic violence were associated with more familiarity with the protocol. Clinicians surveyed after the protocol was in place for a year reported more comfort than clinicians surveyed before implementation (69% reported discomfort with the subject in the pre-test, and 35.4% in the post-test). Knowledge about domestic violence was not associated with training or protocol use (27% reported identification of a DV case before training, and 72.2% after training). Screening and referral skills were associated with specific protocol training.

Conclusions: Training specific to domestic violence screening and referral skills is important to both increase cliniciansÆ comfort level, and increase identification of domestic violence victims in the ED. More is recommended to increase the quality of care given to women in the ED. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of the Use of an Emergency Department Domestic Violence Protocol and its Association with the Attitudes, Knowledge and Skills of Cliniciansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162817-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of the Use of an Emergency Department Domestic Violence Protocol and its Association with the Attitudes, Knowledge and Skills of Clinicians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Kristen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Emergency Medicine - CB#7594, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anna Waller and Susan Hohenhaus</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In recent years, domestic violence has been in the spotlight as a major public health issue. As part of the evaluation of a Domestic Violence protocol, this study, utilizing the framework of social-learning theory, looked at the relationships between the implementation of the protocol, and the knowledge, attitudes and screening/referral skills of ED clinicians.<br/><br/>Design: A comparative design was used to conduct this study.<br/><br/>Setting &amp; Sample: 34 ED clinicians (nurses and physicians) at the University of North Carolina Hospitals, a tertiary care and teaching facility, were surveyed prior to the implementation of a domestic violence protocol and after one year of its use.<br/><br/>Methods: A self-administered questionnaire developed by experts in domestic violence issues, consisting of closed ended questions regarding attitudes and knowledge and open ended questions regarding screening and referral skills was used. The evaluators attempted to survey every clinician. Clinicians were educated about domestic violence issues and trained to use the protocol. To assess screening and referral skills, clinicians were asked what they do when they suspect and confirm a woman to be a domestic violence victim. Pre and post survey data were analyzed using Students T-test for continuous variables and chi-square tests for categorical variables.<br/><br/>Results: High comfort levels regarding talking to patients about domestic violence were associated with more familiarity with the protocol. Clinicians surveyed after the protocol was in place for a year reported more comfort than clinicians surveyed before implementation (69% reported discomfort with the subject in the pre-test, and 35.4% in the post-test). Knowledge about domestic violence was not associated with training or protocol use (27% reported identification of a DV case before training, and 72.2% after training). Screening and referral skills were associated with specific protocol training.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Training specific to domestic violence screening and referral skills is important to both increase clinicians&AElig; comfort level, and increase identification of domestic violence victims in the ED. More is recommended to increase the quality of care given to women in the ED. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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