2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162818
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Management Practices in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Pain Management Practices in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1997
Author:Tanabe, Paula
P.I. Institution Name:Northwest Community Hospital
Contact Address:800 West Central Road, Arlington Hts., IL, 60005, USA
Purpose: A conceptual model consisting of patient and system variables which affect pain in the ED patient was developed for use in this study to describe the experience of pain from the ED patients' perspective and identify patient and system variables which affect pain management in the ED.

Design/Setting: A descriptive design was used to collect the data in a Level 1 Trauma Center Emergency Department.

Sample: the sample consisted of 203 patients who were more than 18 years of age, spoke English and were not disoriented, physiologically or psychologically unstable or intoxicated.

Methodology: All eligible patients who presented with pain during the 8 day, 10 hours per day, data collection period were approached, consent was obtained and they were interviewed using a structured questionnaire which included 15 questions describing pain, including the numeric rating scale and verbal descriptor scale to rate pain intensity. Both measures have established validity and reliability. All ED staff were blinded to the purpose of the interviews. Charts were reviewed retrospectively for the use and timing of analgesics.

Results: Seventy-nine percent of the total census had a chief complaint related to pain and 47% received an analgesic. The average time to analgesic was 73 minutes. Only 15% of the patients received an opioid despite the average pain rating of 6 on a 0-10 scale. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of treatment. The location of chest pain was the only variable which was found to be an independent predictor of treatment of pain, (R=0.14, df=1, p<.05). Independent variables examined included pain rating, location of pain, age, gender, ethnicity and fear of addiction. Only 23 of 160 patients with pain expressed a fear of medications.

Conclusions: Pain in the ED setting is under-identified and poorly managed for a variety of reasons. ED nurses need to further develop pain assessment skills and increase the implementation of all pain management strategies. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Management Practices in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162818-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Management Practices in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tanabe, Paula</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwest Community Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">800 West Central Road, Arlington Hts., IL, 60005, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: A conceptual model consisting of patient and system variables which affect pain in the ED patient was developed for use in this study to describe the experience of pain from the ED patients' perspective and identify patient and system variables which affect pain management in the ED.<br/><br/>Design/Setting: A descriptive design was used to collect the data in a Level 1 Trauma Center Emergency Department.<br/><br/>Sample: the sample consisted of 203 patients who were more than 18 years of age, spoke English and were not disoriented, physiologically or psychologically unstable or intoxicated.<br/><br/>Methodology: All eligible patients who presented with pain during the 8 day, 10 hours per day, data collection period were approached, consent was obtained and they were interviewed using a structured questionnaire which included 15 questions describing pain, including the numeric rating scale and verbal descriptor scale to rate pain intensity. Both measures have established validity and reliability. All ED staff were blinded to the purpose of the interviews. Charts were reviewed retrospectively for the use and timing of analgesics.<br/><br/>Results: Seventy-nine percent of the total census had a chief complaint related to pain and 47% received an analgesic. The average time to analgesic was 73 minutes. Only 15% of the patients received an opioid despite the average pain rating of 6 on a 0-10 scale. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of treatment. The location of chest pain was the only variable which was found to be an independent predictor of treatment of pain, (R=0.14, df=1, p&lt;.05). Independent variables examined included pain rating, location of pain, age, gender, ethnicity and fear of addiction. Only 23 of 160 patients with pain expressed a fear of medications.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Pain in the ED setting is under-identified and poorly managed for a variety of reasons. ED nurses need to further develop pain assessment skills and increase the implementation of all pain management strategies. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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