The Comparison of Aural and Rectal Temperature Measurements in Moderately and Severely Injured Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162823
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Comparison of Aural and Rectal Temperature Measurements in Moderately and Severely Injured Children
Abstract:
The Comparison of Aural and Rectal Temperature Measurements in Moderately and Severely Injured Children
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Clemence, Bonnie, RN, MSN, CEN
Co-Authors:Bonnie Hogue, RN, BSN; Peter Walters, RN, BSN; Lisa Marie Bernardo, RN, PhD, CEN; and Richard Henker, RN, PhD, CCRN
Purpose: Accurate and convenient temperature measurements are necessary to detect hypothermia in injured children and to evaluate the need for re-warming measures. Temperatures should be measured at a site that accurately reflects the core temperature. The purpose of this study was to compare initial rectal and aural temperature measurements in moderately and severely injured children during their emergency department treatment.

Design: A cross-sectional, prospective design was used to compare aural and rectal temperatures.

Setting: The setting was the ED of a level I pediatric trauma center.

Sample: Forty moderately and severely injured children (mean age = 7 years, SD = 4.4) were enrolled. Excluded from this study were children with spinal cord injury, pelvic fractures, rectal trauma, and bilateral hemotympanum.

Methodology: The investigators obtained rectal and aural temperature measurements after the trauma surgeon's initial assessment. One Core Check Tympanic Thermometer and one Temp-Plus II rectal thermometer IVAC Corporation, San Diego, CA, were used for data collection; these thermometers received scheduled accuracy checks and calibration. Consistency in measurement technique among the investigators was demonstrated.

Results: The mean rectal temperature was 36.8 degrees C (SD = 1.4d egrees C), and the mean aural temperature was 36.5 degreesC (SD = 1.3 degrees C). The mean difference between rectal and aural temperatures (mean = -.27 degrees C; SD =0.76 degrees C) was statistically significant when compared using a paired t-test (p< .05). The association between aural and rectal temperature was high (r = .85) when calculated using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient.

Conclusions: The high correlation between the two methods shows promise for using the aural route as a screening measure for moderately and severely injured children. While a significant statistical difference in the pairwise comparisons is noted, a difference of -0.27degrees C and a high standard deviation are comparable to other studies. Emergency nurses may consider obtaining aural temperature measurements as a screening measure during initial ED treatment. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Comparison of Aural and Rectal Temperature Measurements in Moderately and Severely Injured Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162823-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Comparison of Aural and Rectal Temperature Measurements in Moderately and Severely Injured Children<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clemence, Bonnie, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Hogue, RN, BSN; Peter Walters, RN, BSN; Lisa Marie Bernardo, RN, PhD, CEN; and Richard Henker, RN, PhD, CCRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Accurate and convenient temperature measurements are necessary to detect hypothermia in injured children and to evaluate the need for re-warming measures. Temperatures should be measured at a site that accurately reflects the core temperature. The purpose of this study was to compare initial rectal and aural temperature measurements in moderately and severely injured children during their emergency department treatment.<br/><br/>Design: A cross-sectional, prospective design was used to compare aural and rectal temperatures.<br/><br/>Setting: The setting was the ED of a level I pediatric trauma center. <br/><br/>Sample: Forty moderately and severely injured children (mean age = 7 years, SD = 4.4) were enrolled. Excluded from this study were children with spinal cord injury, pelvic fractures, rectal trauma, and bilateral hemotympanum.<br/><br/>Methodology: The investigators obtained rectal and aural temperature measurements after the trauma surgeon's initial assessment. One Core Check Tympanic Thermometer and one Temp-Plus II rectal thermometer IVAC Corporation, San Diego, CA, were used for data collection; these thermometers received scheduled accuracy checks and calibration. Consistency in measurement technique among the investigators was demonstrated.<br/><br/>Results: The mean rectal temperature was 36.8 degrees C (SD = 1.4d egrees C), and the mean aural temperature was 36.5 degreesC (SD = 1.3 degrees C). The mean difference between rectal and aural temperatures (mean = -.27 degrees C; SD =0.76 degrees C) was statistically significant when compared using a paired t-test (p&lt; .05). The association between aural and rectal temperature was high (r = .85) when calculated using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient.<br/><br/>Conclusions: The high correlation between the two methods shows promise for using the aural route as a screening measure for moderately and severely injured children. While a significant statistical difference in the pairwise comparisons is noted, a difference of -0.27degrees C and a high standard deviation are comparable to other studies. Emergency nurses may consider obtaining aural temperature measurements as a screening measure during initial ED treatment. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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