Hazardous Materials Preparedness Training in Preparation for Chemical Weaponry Destruction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162826
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hazardous Materials Preparedness Training in Preparation for Chemical Weaponry Destruction
Abstract:
Hazardous Materials Preparedness Training in Preparation for Chemical Weaponry Destruction
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Day, Suzanne R., RN, MA, CEN
The purpose of this clinical project was to develop an instruction program on the treatment and medical management of chemical warfare agents. The unique challenge facing Utah's health care personnel is preparing providers to safety treat victims in the event of an accidental chemical contamination. The largest share of the nation's chemical weapon stores are currently housed in Utah. The entire U.S. stockpile of chemical weapons is distributed between eight states and an island in the South Pacific. The current stockpile produced decades ago is now obsolete for our modern defense system. The greater risk is that many of these weapons are starting to deteriorate in storage and pose a risk to the public safety. The stockpile consists of two basic types of chemical agents, mustard agents which form blisters on human tissue and nerve agents which affect the nervous system causing death by respiratory paralysis. A one-day training class for nurses, physicians and security personnel on exposure to chemical warfare agents was provided by the military. The course was devoted to a hazardous approach to toxic substances with additional information provided on the specialized aspects of chemical warfare agents. The content consisted of basic hazardous materials, chemical agents, personal protective equipment and ED preparation. The course also allowed individuals to participate in a simulated decontamination, donning and doffing of equipment and case scenario review. Evaluations of the course were positive and participants appreciated the demonstration of equipment. Skills learned in the course as well as participation in mock disaster drills will be reviewed annually. A task force comprised of nurses, physicians and representatives from government agencies identified local criteria and developed standardized guidelines to assist personnel in hazardous materials training. States that currently house chemical weaponry may find that working together and sharing information can ease the burden of educating staff in a decidedly different area of practice and preparedness. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHazardous Materials Preparedness Training in Preparation for Chemical Weaponry Destructionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162826-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hazardous Materials Preparedness Training in Preparation for Chemical Weaponry Destruction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Day, Suzanne R., RN, MA, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this clinical project was to develop an instruction program on the treatment and medical management of chemical warfare agents. The unique challenge facing Utah's health care personnel is preparing providers to safety treat victims in the event of an accidental chemical contamination. The largest share of the nation's chemical weapon stores are currently housed in Utah. The entire U.S. stockpile of chemical weapons is distributed between eight states and an island in the South Pacific. The current stockpile produced decades ago is now obsolete for our modern defense system. The greater risk is that many of these weapons are starting to deteriorate in storage and pose a risk to the public safety. The stockpile consists of two basic types of chemical agents, mustard agents which form blisters on human tissue and nerve agents which affect the nervous system causing death by respiratory paralysis. A one-day training class for nurses, physicians and security personnel on exposure to chemical warfare agents was provided by the military. The course was devoted to a hazardous approach to toxic substances with additional information provided on the specialized aspects of chemical warfare agents. The content consisted of basic hazardous materials, chemical agents, personal protective equipment and ED preparation. The course also allowed individuals to participate in a simulated decontamination, donning and doffing of equipment and case scenario review. Evaluations of the course were positive and participants appreciated the demonstration of equipment. Skills learned in the course as well as participation in mock disaster drills will be reviewed annually. A task force comprised of nurses, physicians and representatives from government agencies identified local criteria and developed standardized guidelines to assist personnel in hazardous materials training. States that currently house chemical weaponry may find that working together and sharing information can ease the burden of educating staff in a decidedly different area of practice and preparedness. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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