2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162830
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Delivery of Non-urgent Care in a Level One Trauma Center
Abstract:
Delivery of Non-urgent Care in a Level One Trauma Center


Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Mornhinweg, Gail C., RN, PhD
Co-Authors:Ruth R. Voignier, MSN, MN; Donna W. Carillo, BSN; Jill B. Keller, MSN; M. Lucinda Kessler, MSN; and Delwin Jacoby, MSN, FNP
A retrospective chart review of 2,025 records was used to describe the client population and identify practice patterns of nurse practitioners in a fast track setting in an urban university, level one trauma center. The sample included all non-urgent patients seen by a nurse practitioner (NP) on two randomly selected days per week for the first 14 months the fast track was in operation. Hospital policies and established protocols limited the population to persons ages 18-64 with selected chief complaints on triage.

Data collected included demographics, employment, insurance and mode of transportation to the ED. Additional data included chief complaint, discharge diagnosis, referrals, tests ordered, consultations requested, medications prescribed, and durable equipment ordered.

Results of the patient profile indicated that 78% were between the ages of 18-44 years, males (58.8%), single (78.6%), employed (52.5%), but uninsured (63.9%), and nearly equal numbers of African-Americans (48.8%) and Caucasians (49.5%). Sixty-two percent came from zip codes immediately adjacent to the medical center.

Chief complaints reported on triage were consistent with discharge diagnoses recorded by the NPs. The most frequently seen diagnoses were musculoskeletal injuries (38.6%) and dermatological problems (21.7%). Other common diagnosis included ENT (14.5%) and respiratory (9.3%). Successful triage to the fast track was evidenced by the low percentage (2%) of patients who required referral back to the main ER. The NPs' orders for diagnostic tests, medication and assistive devices were consistent with the diagnoses.

Data from this study indicate that a large number of persons use the fast track for a variety of non-urgent conditions. Many patients access the ED for their primary care needs even though less expensive care facilities are available. Nurse practitioner can provide an effective way to care for patients with non-urgent conditions in a level one trauma center. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDelivery of Non-urgent Care in a Level One Trauma Centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162830-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Delivery of Non-urgent Care in a Level One Trauma Center<br/><br/><br/></td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mornhinweg, Gail C., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ruth R. Voignier, MSN, MN; Donna W. Carillo, BSN; Jill B. Keller, MSN; M. Lucinda Kessler, MSN; and Delwin Jacoby, MSN, FNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A retrospective chart review of 2,025 records was used to describe the client population and identify practice patterns of nurse practitioners in a fast track setting in an urban university, level one trauma center. The sample included all non-urgent patients seen by a nurse practitioner (NP) on two randomly selected days per week for the first 14 months the fast track was in operation. Hospital policies and established protocols limited the population to persons ages 18-64 with selected chief complaints on triage.<br/><br/>Data collected included demographics, employment, insurance and mode of transportation to the ED. Additional data included chief complaint, discharge diagnosis, referrals, tests ordered, consultations requested, medications prescribed, and durable equipment ordered.<br/><br/>Results of the patient profile indicated that 78% were between the ages of 18-44 years, males (58.8%), single (78.6%), employed (52.5%), but uninsured (63.9%), and nearly equal numbers of African-Americans (48.8%) and Caucasians (49.5%). Sixty-two percent came from zip codes immediately adjacent to the medical center.<br/><br/>Chief complaints reported on triage were consistent with discharge diagnoses recorded by the NPs. The most frequently seen diagnoses were musculoskeletal injuries (38.6%) and dermatological problems (21.7%). Other common diagnosis included ENT (14.5%) and respiratory (9.3%). Successful triage to the fast track was evidenced by the low percentage (2%) of patients who required referral back to the main ER. The NPs' orders for diagnostic tests, medication and assistive devices were consistent with the diagnoses.<br/><br/>Data from this study indicate that a large number of persons use the fast track for a variety of non-urgent conditions. Many patients access the ED for their primary care needs even though less expensive care facilities are available. Nurse practitioner can provide an effective way to care for patients with non-urgent conditions in a level one trauma center. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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