A Comparative Study of the Grief Responses Between Emergency Department Nurses in Adult and Pediatric Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162832
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparative Study of the Grief Responses Between Emergency Department Nurses in Adult and Pediatric Settings
Abstract:
A Comparative Study of the Grief Responses Between Emergency Department Nurses in Adult and Pediatric Settings
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Presley, Diane, RN, MSN
Purpose: Emergency Department Nurses experience grief when working with adult and pediatric patients who have catastrophic illnesses or suffer alterations in health from disease, trauma, or death. This study examines the differences in the grief responses associated with patient loss in emergency nurses who work in adult and pediatric emergency care settings. The theory of Joyce Travelbee and the concept of suffering were utilized for this research.

Design/Setting: A comparative descriptive design was used in this study. The setting was a large urban Level I trauma center, and an inner city childrenÆs hospital emergency department.

Method: A structured, self-administered questionnaire, The Grief Experience Inventory (GEI) developed by Sanders, Mauger and Strong, was utilized. The format of the tool is divided into two parts: (a) The Validity Scales, and (2) The Bereavement Scales. These scales are further grouped into three separate categories, feelings/emotional changes, behavioral changes, and physical changes.

Results: Thirty emergency nurses completed the GEI, which consists of nine bereavement scales (despair, anger/hostility, guilt, social isolation, loss of control, rumination, depression, somatization, and death anxiety). Scales were further grouped into three categories of feeling or emotional changes, physical changes and behavioral changes. Results indicated that there were significant differences in scores in three scales (despair, P= -.003, anger/hostility, p= .004, and somatization, p= .025), and all three categories (feelings, p= .028, physical changes, p= .032, and behavioral changes, p= .012). Pediatric emergency nurses reported greater intensity of grief in relation to patient loss than emergency nurses caring for adults.

Conclusion: Emergency nurses who work in pediatric and adult settings frequently express grief through feeling, behavioral, and physical changes. Recommendations include interventions that can provide support in an effort to reduce the negative responses of the grief experience, and reduce burnout in the profession. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparative Study of the Grief Responses Between Emergency Department Nurses in Adult and Pediatric Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162832-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparative Study of the Grief Responses Between Emergency Department Nurses in Adult and Pediatric Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Presley, Diane, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Emergency Department Nurses experience grief when working with adult and pediatric patients who have catastrophic illnesses or suffer alterations in health from disease, trauma, or death. This study examines the differences in the grief responses associated with patient loss in emergency nurses who work in adult and pediatric emergency care settings. The theory of Joyce Travelbee and the concept of suffering were utilized for this research.<br/><br/>Design/Setting: A comparative descriptive design was used in this study. The setting was a large urban Level I trauma center, and an inner city children&AElig;s hospital emergency department.<br/><br/>Method: A structured, self-administered questionnaire, The Grief Experience Inventory (GEI) developed by Sanders, Mauger and Strong, was utilized. The format of the tool is divided into two parts: (a) The Validity Scales, and (2) The Bereavement Scales. These scales are further grouped into three separate categories, feelings/emotional changes, behavioral changes, and physical changes.<br/><br/>Results: Thirty emergency nurses completed the GEI, which consists of nine bereavement scales (despair, anger/hostility, guilt, social isolation, loss of control, rumination, depression, somatization, and death anxiety). Scales were further grouped into three categories of feeling or emotional changes, physical changes and behavioral changes. Results indicated that there were significant differences in scores in three scales (despair, P= -.003, anger/hostility, p= .004, and somatization, p= .025), and all three categories (feelings, p= .028, physical changes, p= .032, and behavioral changes, p= .012). Pediatric emergency nurses reported greater intensity of grief in relation to patient loss than emergency nurses caring for adults.<br/><br/>Conclusion: Emergency nurses who work in pediatric and adult settings frequently express grief through feeling, behavioral, and physical changes. Recommendations include interventions that can provide support in an effort to reduce the negative responses of the grief experience, and reduce burnout in the profession. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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