Pain Assessment Documentation in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162834
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Assessment Documentation in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Study
Abstract:
Pain Assessment Documentation in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Study
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Renn, Cynthia, RN, BSN
Co-Authors:Gale Thomason
The key to managing pain effectively lies, not only in the thorough assessment process, but also in the documentation of that assessment. A large amount of literature is available that states the importance of pain assessment documentation, however, very little has been written concerning the amount of documentation actually being done in the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the amount of pain assessment documentation being done in one emergency department. A conceptual framework with pain as the construct and documentation as the concept being measured was utilized. The study design was a descriptive retrospective chart review. An emergency department in a 577 bed teaching hospital/level II trauma center was the setting. Charts for review were selected using a convenience sample from the month of December 1994. The only criterion for inclusion was the word pain appearing as part of the chief complaint made by the patient. The researcher-designed tool used was a data collection sheet to record the necessary data. No information concerning tool reliability and validity is available. Study results (N=151) indicate that little documentation of pain assessment was being done at the time the chosen charts were completed by the nurses. Only 8 charts contained documentation that the patient had pain during the initial physical assessment and of these, 3 included documentation using a pain scale. It is evident to the investigator that additional research into this area is needed. This study is a small first step in exploring how well pain is managed in the emergency department setting. Future research should be done to investigate the knowledge and understanding of the pain and its assessment by emergency nurses, as well as the importance these nurses placed on pain. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Assessment Documentation in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162834-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Assessment Documentation in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Renn, Cynthia, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gale Thomason</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The key to managing pain effectively lies, not only in the thorough assessment process, but also in the documentation of that assessment. A large amount of literature is available that states the importance of pain assessment documentation, however, very little has been written concerning the amount of documentation actually being done in the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the amount of pain assessment documentation being done in one emergency department. A conceptual framework with pain as the construct and documentation as the concept being measured was utilized. The study design was a descriptive retrospective chart review. An emergency department in a 577 bed teaching hospital/level II trauma center was the setting. Charts for review were selected using a convenience sample from the month of December 1994. The only criterion for inclusion was the word pain appearing as part of the chief complaint made by the patient. The researcher-designed tool used was a data collection sheet to record the necessary data. No information concerning tool reliability and validity is available. Study results (N=151) indicate that little documentation of pain assessment was being done at the time the chosen charts were completed by the nurses. Only 8 charts contained documentation that the patient had pain during the initial physical assessment and of these, 3 included documentation using a pain scale. It is evident to the investigator that additional research into this area is needed. This study is a small first step in exploring how well pain is managed in the emergency department setting. Future research should be done to investigate the knowledge and understanding of the pain and its assessment by emergency nurses, as well as the importance these nurses placed on pain. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:34:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:34:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.