2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162841
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Earthquakes in El Salvador: Mental Health and Psychosocial Effects
Abstract:
Earthquakes in El Salvador: Mental Health and Psychosocial Effects
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Snyder, Audrey, RN, MSN, CEN, ACNP-CS
P.I. Institution Name:University of VA School of Nursing/Emergency Medicine
Title:Assistant Professor/Nurse Practitioner
School of Nursing/Emergency Medicine
Contact Address:1451 Garth Run Road, Madison, VA, 22727, USA
Contact Telephone:(434) 924-0094
Co-Authors:Joanna Woersching, RN, BSN
Purpose: In 2001, the mountain town of San Sebastian, El Salvador experienced a series of earthquakes
affecting the livelihood of the community. This geographically isolated community had to provide for its
own needs without any international support. The ability to recover is influenced by a number of factors.
The purpose of this study was to identify variables that affect an earthquake victim?s mental health, and to
identify the commonly reported mental health complaints. The goal was to provide health officials with
information to develop a mental health screening tool for their community.
Design/Setting/Sample: A convenience sample of 100 households, identified by the local Red Cross or
local government public health clinic, including 594 inhabitants of San Sebastian and the surrounding rural
farming areas, was asked to complete a health assessment survey. The oral survey was administered six
months after two devastating earthquakes. Inclusion criteria was residency in the town of San Sebastian
(41%) or in the rural farming area (59%) surrounding the town and age of 18 when interviewed. Of the
respondents, 30% were male and 70% female. The mean age was 45 years with a range of 18 to 86 years.
Methodology: One study participant willing to complete the survey from each household was evaluated
for mental health and psychosocial changes after the earthquakes as a part of an overall community health
assessment. A questionnaire was used to investigate the relationship between physical health, access to
health care, housing, food and water, and the occurrence of negative mental health markers. The mental
health section consisted of 10 questions that were part of the larger 32-question oral survey. The mental
health survey questions reflected the general symptoms of general depressive disorders and anxiety disorders
of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders. Descriptive statistics were compiled
with SPSS. A chi-square test of independence identified statistical significance between individual respondent
variables and the presence of six or more negative mental health markers.
Results: The findings indicated that the majority (67%) of respondents experienced six or more mental
health complaints continuously for two or more weeks after the earthquakes. The two most frequent complaints
were having thoughts of death and feeling sad or depressed. A change in household income and
loss of job, a new illness or injury in the household, the need to utilize health care services since the earthquake,
and management of a chronic illness were risk factors associated with multiple negative mental
health markers. Participants experienced emotional reactions 6 months following the earthquakes. Age and
gender were not independently statistically significant.
Conclusions: The findings indicate a need for rapid, acute mental health screening with at-risk groups and
the need to educate the entire community regarding what medical and mental health treatments are available
to reduce barriers to treatment and increase public awareness. The mental health tool may be used by
nurses to identify at-risk groups for posttraumatic stress, anxiety, or depression following an earthquake
and to provide rapid initial and intermediate assessment for mental health. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarthquakes in El Salvador: Mental Health and Psychosocial Effectsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162841-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Earthquakes in El Salvador: Mental Health and Psychosocial Effects</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Snyder, Audrey, RN, MSN, CEN, ACNP-CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of VA School of Nursing/Emergency Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor/Nurse Practitioner<br/>School of Nursing/Emergency Medicine<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1451 Garth Run Road, Madison, VA, 22727, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(434) 924-0094</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aew3e@virginia.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joanna Woersching, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In 2001, the mountain town of San Sebastian, El Salvador experienced a series of earthquakes<br/>affecting the livelihood of the community. This geographically isolated community had to provide for its<br/>own needs without any international support. The ability to recover is influenced by a number of factors.<br/>The purpose of this study was to identify variables that affect an earthquake victim?s mental health, and to<br/>identify the commonly reported mental health complaints. The goal was to provide health officials with<br/>information to develop a mental health screening tool for their community.<br/>Design/Setting/Sample: A convenience sample of 100 households, identified by the local Red Cross or<br/>local government public health clinic, including 594 inhabitants of San Sebastian and the surrounding rural<br/>farming areas, was asked to complete a health assessment survey. The oral survey was administered six<br/>months after two devastating earthquakes. Inclusion criteria was residency in the town of San Sebastian<br/>(41%) or in the rural farming area (59%) surrounding the town and age of 18 when interviewed. Of the<br/>respondents, 30% were male and 70% female. The mean age was 45 years with a range of 18 to 86 years.<br/>Methodology: One study participant willing to complete the survey from each household was evaluated<br/>for mental health and psychosocial changes after the earthquakes as a part of an overall community health<br/>assessment. A questionnaire was used to investigate the relationship between physical health, access to<br/>health care, housing, food and water, and the occurrence of negative mental health markers. The mental<br/>health section consisted of 10 questions that were part of the larger 32-question oral survey. The mental<br/>health survey questions reflected the general symptoms of general depressive disorders and anxiety disorders<br/>of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders. Descriptive statistics were compiled<br/>with SPSS. A chi-square test of independence identified statistical significance between individual respondent<br/>variables and the presence of six or more negative mental health markers.<br/>Results: The findings indicated that the majority (67%) of respondents experienced six or more mental<br/>health complaints continuously for two or more weeks after the earthquakes. The two most frequent complaints<br/>were having thoughts of death and feeling sad or depressed. A change in household income and<br/>loss of job, a new illness or injury in the household, the need to utilize health care services since the earthquake,<br/>and management of a chronic illness were risk factors associated with multiple negative mental<br/>health markers. Participants experienced emotional reactions 6 months following the earthquakes. Age and<br/>gender were not independently statistically significant.<br/>Conclusions: The findings indicate a need for rapid, acute mental health screening with at-risk groups and<br/>the need to educate the entire community regarding what medical and mental health treatments are available<br/>to reduce barriers to treatment and increase public awareness. The mental health tool may be used by<br/>nurses to identify at-risk groups for posttraumatic stress, anxiety, or depression following an earthquake<br/>and to provide rapid initial and intermediate assessment for mental health. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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