Chaos to Order-Meeting the Needs of an Emergency Department Pushed to the Limit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162847
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chaos to Order-Meeting the Needs of an Emergency Department Pushed to the Limit
Abstract:
Chaos to Order-Meeting the Needs of an Emergency Department Pushed to the Limit
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:DiMarco, Lisa, RN, BSN, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:Edward Hospital and Health Services
Title:Lisa DiMarco, RN, BSN, MBA
Contact Address:801 S. Washington, Naperville, IL, 60540, USA
Contact Telephone:(630) 527-3368
Co-Authors:Sandy Clow, RN; Jan Gillespie, RN, BA; Nancy Goodman, RN; Alan Kaplan, MD; Silvio Morales, MD; Nancy Salamie, RN; Kathy Jo Stegman, RN, BSN; Mary Lee Strahanoski, RN; and Sally Ellen Szablewski, RN
Purpose: The increasing demand for services in an emergency department compromises patient flow, creating patient dissatisfaction. The increased demand for services coupled with the nursing shortage and patient expectations leads to frustration among the caregivers. Design: The emergency department team model of care became a staff process improvement initiative that changed the department from physician-directed to a team approach. Setting: This suburban emergency department and Level II trauma center treated almost 54,000 patients in fiscal 2002 in a facility designed to handle 40,000 visits. Participants: The emergency department was divided into two teams consisting of 10 beds, one ED physician, three registered nurses, one unit clerk, and one technician per team. The pediatric ED functions has its own team with the same staffing components. One charge nurse is staffed to manage the patient flow. Methods: The main process used to change a large busy emergency department into smaller working components included: a) observing the night shift and the pediatric emergency department, areas that already used a successful team structure; and b) carefully extrapolating important information from patient surveys. The goals of the plan were to decrease chaos, improve efficiency, balance workflow equally among all caregivers, increase patient and employee satisfaction, and increase throughput. The team model allowed the charge nurse to distribute patients to the appropriate team based on acuity and bed availability. Team model meetings were scheduled every two weeks to develop the model and held monthly to discuss challenges and achieve solutions. The ED staff was educated on the model and the model was implemented quickly. Results: Patient satisfaction increased from 41% to 83% and nursing satisfaction reached the 100th percentile. ED physicians, who previously controlled the flow of the department, are now more efficient and proactive in their care. Patient volumes are still increasing but the time from ED arrival to physician assessment has dramatically decreased. A new 50-bed emergency department will start construction in November 2002, and is based on the team model. Recommendations: Changing the emergency department to a team model of care has increased satisfaction on all levels. The process improvement initiative is dynamic, allowing for credibility and workability. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChaos to Order-Meeting the Needs of an Emergency Department Pushed to the Limiten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162847-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Chaos to Order-Meeting the Needs of an Emergency Department Pushed to the Limit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DiMarco, Lisa, RN, BSN, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Edward Hospital and Health Services</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lisa DiMarco, RN, BSN, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">801 S. Washington, Naperville, IL, 60540, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(630) 527-3368</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ldimarco@edward.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandy Clow, RN; Jan Gillespie, RN, BA; Nancy Goodman, RN; Alan Kaplan, MD; Silvio Morales, MD; Nancy Salamie, RN; Kathy Jo Stegman, RN, BSN; Mary Lee Strahanoski, RN; and Sally Ellen Szablewski, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The increasing demand for services in an emergency department compromises patient flow, creating patient dissatisfaction. The increased demand for services coupled with the nursing shortage and patient expectations leads to frustration among the caregivers. Design: The emergency department team model of care became a staff process improvement initiative that changed the department from physician-directed to a team approach. Setting: This suburban emergency department and Level II trauma center treated almost 54,000 patients in fiscal 2002 in a facility designed to handle 40,000 visits. Participants: The emergency department was divided into two teams consisting of 10 beds, one ED physician, three registered nurses, one unit clerk, and one technician per team. The pediatric ED functions has its own team with the same staffing components. One charge nurse is staffed to manage the patient flow. Methods: The main process used to change a large busy emergency department into smaller working components included: a) observing the night shift and the pediatric emergency department, areas that already used a successful team structure; and b) carefully extrapolating important information from patient surveys. The goals of the plan were to decrease chaos, improve efficiency, balance workflow equally among all caregivers, increase patient and employee satisfaction, and increase throughput. The team model allowed the charge nurse to distribute patients to the appropriate team based on acuity and bed availability. Team model meetings were scheduled every two weeks to develop the model and held monthly to discuss challenges and achieve solutions. The ED staff was educated on the model and the model was implemented quickly. Results: Patient satisfaction increased from 41% to 83% and nursing satisfaction reached the 100th percentile. ED physicians, who previously controlled the flow of the department, are now more efficient and proactive in their care. Patient volumes are still increasing but the time from ED arrival to physician assessment has dramatically decreased. A new 50-bed emergency department will start construction in November 2002, and is based on the team model. Recommendations: Changing the emergency department to a team model of care has increased satisfaction on all levels. The process improvement initiative is dynamic, allowing for credibility and workability. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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