2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162848
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advanced Cardiac Life Support Evaluation Using Human Simulation Manikin
Abstract:
Advanced Cardiac Life Support Evaluation Using Human Simulation Manikin
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Eichorn, Mary, RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University Hospital, University of New Mexico Health Science Center
Title:Mary Eichorn, RN, MSN, CEN
Contact Address:636 San Pablo NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87108, USA
Contact Telephone:(505) 272-5471
Purpose: Technology has provided a better way to assess knowledge and skills concerning Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). The human patient stimulator, Stan, is a lifelike, interactive manikin. Stan provides the realism of a patient responding to disease states and therapeutic interventions in an environment that is free of patient risk. The instructor can adjust Stan's clinical condition according to the care given, simultaneously evaluating the participant's knowledge, psychomotor skills, and ability to adapt to the situation. Setting Participants: This Level I trauma center, affiliated with a university, trains a variety of health care professionals from all disciplines, many of whom use ACLS within their scope of practice. The participants who were evaluated using Stan were self-described experienced providers who used ACLS as a regular part of their job. Methods: The research group (n=24) was evaluated against a comparison group of experienced providers (n=24) who had taken a standard ACLS course. Success in the standard ACLS course is measured through demonstrating proficiency in Basic Life Support, passing the American Heart Association ACLS exam with 84%, passing a department-generated arrhythmia exam with 85%, and achieving 84% of the criteria required for each ACLS case, as written on the "Critical Actions for ACLS Providers" skills sheets. Before interacting with the simulator, the participants had to demonstrate the same Basic Life Support and tests proficiencies required in a standard course. But in interacting with Stan, the participants must achieve 84% on the skills sheets developed for the simulator course. These skill sheets incorporate all 10 ACLS cases into three scenarios, based on the "Critical Actions for ACLS Providers." All participants were given a standardized introduction to Stan. Each participant worked with a group of two to three other participants and took turns being team leader. Appropriate actions were checked off on a skill sheet as they were achieved. All simulator sessions were videotaped to allow for an educational debriefing session. Results: Of the 24 participants who had taken ACLS incorporating the human patient simulator, 18 (75%) were successful (scored at least 84% out of 100% total on their skills sheet) in their first scenario. Four were successful after debriefing, and two were not able to successfully complete their second scenario. The comparison group was equivalent in their test scores, but out of the 24, three were unable to complete the ACLS course after their skills stations. Recommendations: Due to the small sample size, additional evaluation of the human patient simulator for adult learning should be done. Stan allowed participants to choose therapies and observe the consequences of their choices without jeopardizing patients. Long-term retention of information needs to be measured. Students stated appreciation of this new method for learning and evaluating ACLS. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvanced Cardiac Life Support Evaluation Using Human Simulation Manikinen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162848-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Advanced Cardiac Life Support Evaluation Using Human Simulation Manikin</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Eichorn, Mary, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University Hospital, University of New Mexico Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Mary Eichorn, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">636 San Pablo NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(505) 272-5471</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">meichorn@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Technology has provided a better way to assess knowledge and skills concerning Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). The human patient stimulator, Stan, is a lifelike, interactive manikin. Stan provides the realism of a patient responding to disease states and therapeutic interventions in an environment that is free of patient risk. The instructor can adjust Stan's clinical condition according to the care given, simultaneously evaluating the participant's knowledge, psychomotor skills, and ability to adapt to the situation. Setting Participants: This Level I trauma center, affiliated with a university, trains a variety of health care professionals from all disciplines, many of whom use ACLS within their scope of practice. The participants who were evaluated using Stan were self-described experienced providers who used ACLS as a regular part of their job. Methods: The research group (n=24) was evaluated against a comparison group of experienced providers (n=24) who had taken a standard ACLS course. Success in the standard ACLS course is measured through demonstrating proficiency in Basic Life Support, passing the American Heart Association ACLS exam with 84%, passing a department-generated arrhythmia exam with 85%, and achieving 84% of the criteria required for each ACLS case, as written on the &quot;Critical Actions for ACLS Providers&quot; skills sheets. Before interacting with the simulator, the participants had to demonstrate the same Basic Life Support and tests proficiencies required in a standard course. But in interacting with Stan, the participants must achieve 84% on the skills sheets developed for the simulator course. These skill sheets incorporate all 10 ACLS cases into three scenarios, based on the &quot;Critical Actions for ACLS Providers.&quot; All participants were given a standardized introduction to Stan. Each participant worked with a group of two to three other participants and took turns being team leader. Appropriate actions were checked off on a skill sheet as they were achieved. All simulator sessions were videotaped to allow for an educational debriefing session. Results: Of the 24 participants who had taken ACLS incorporating the human patient simulator, 18 (75%) were successful (scored at least 84% out of 100% total on their skills sheet) in their first scenario. Four were successful after debriefing, and two were not able to successfully complete their second scenario. The comparison group was equivalent in their test scores, but out of the 24, three were unable to complete the ACLS course after their skills stations. Recommendations: Due to the small sample size, additional evaluation of the human patient simulator for adult learning should be done. Stan allowed participants to choose therapies and observe the consequences of their choices without jeopardizing patients. Long-term retention of information needs to be measured. Students stated appreciation of this new method for learning and evaluating ACLS. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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