2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162851
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Administrative, Practice and Educational Needs of ED Nurses
Abstract:
Administrative, Practice and Educational Needs of ED Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Keough, Vicki, RN, PhD, ACNP, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago, School of Nursing
Title:Vicki Keough, RN, PhD, ACNP, CCRN
Contact Address:8557 S. Karlov, Chicago, IL, 60652, USA
Contact Telephone:(708) 216-3582
Co-Authors:Paula Tanabe, RN, PhD; Rita Schlomer, RN, MS; and Barbara Bollenberg, RN, PhD ( c )
Purpose: Ed nurses report feeling overburdened, understaffed, and unsafe. Karasek's Job Strain Model helps identify the barriers preventing nurses from being satisfied, the demands that overburden nurses, and the rewards that keep some nurses at their jobs. This study, using Karasek's model, examined the feelings and needs of ED nurses in Illinois. Design: An exploratory descriptive study was conducted using a focus-group research methodology. Setting and Participants: The convenience sample consisted of ED nurses enrolled among participants at the Illinois ENA Spring Symposium. Volunteers were invited to self-select into one of four groups: managers (n=8); advanced practice nurses (n=8); or staff nurses (two groups, n=9, 10). Each group was limited to a maximum of 10 participants. Informed consent was obtained. Methods: Based on indices from Karasek's job strain model, three focus group questions were asked. The principal investigator led all groups. Participant responses were tape-recorded and tapes transcribed verbatim. Responses were coded by researchers, searching for major themes. Inter-rater reliability was established using a group normative process. Findings were validated by an independent researcher. Results: Barriers keeping nurses from being satisfied in their jobs included an overwhelming response to high patient volumes, understaffing, and poor retention of experienced nurses. Additional factors were poor pay, lack of support staff and administrative support, high use of agency nurses, poor quality of life, unsafe work environment, poor communication between the emergency department and other departments, and overuse of the emergency department by private physicians. Advanced practice nurses reported specific barriers; lack of role appreciation and specialty certification, legal barriers, lack of power, resistance from staff, and low pay. Facilitators for Ed nurses included: educational and administrative support, supportive staff in the emergency department, good pay, and increased pay for additional certifications and education. Facilitators to ED flow were: visitor control, increased use of a bedside laboratory, and faxing reports to floors when transferring patients. Recommendations: Hospital and ED administrators need to make the retention of their experienced nurses a high priority. Findings from this study reveal several areas that can improve nurse retention in the emergency department. Improving the image of ED nurses, safe staffing, a safe work environment, and certification for advanced practice nurses in their specialty area will help reduce barriers and facilitate job satisfaction for ED nurses. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdministrative, Practice and Educational Needs of ED Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162851-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Administrative, Practice and Educational Needs of ED Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keough, Vicki, RN, PhD, ACNP, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Vicki Keough, RN, PhD, ACNP, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8557 S. Karlov, Chicago, IL, 60652, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(708) 216-3582</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vkeough@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Paula Tanabe, RN, PhD; Rita Schlomer, RN, MS; and Barbara Bollenberg, RN, PhD ( c )</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Ed nurses report feeling overburdened, understaffed, and unsafe. Karasek's Job Strain Model helps identify the barriers preventing nurses from being satisfied, the demands that overburden nurses, and the rewards that keep some nurses at their jobs. This study, using Karasek's model, examined the feelings and needs of ED nurses in Illinois. Design: An exploratory descriptive study was conducted using a focus-group research methodology. Setting and Participants: The convenience sample consisted of ED nurses enrolled among participants at the Illinois ENA Spring Symposium. Volunteers were invited to self-select into one of four groups: managers (n=8); advanced practice nurses (n=8); or staff nurses (two groups, n=9, 10). Each group was limited to a maximum of 10 participants. Informed consent was obtained. Methods: Based on indices from Karasek's job strain model, three focus group questions were asked. The principal investigator led all groups. Participant responses were tape-recorded and tapes transcribed verbatim. Responses were coded by researchers, searching for major themes. Inter-rater reliability was established using a group normative process. Findings were validated by an independent researcher. Results: Barriers keeping nurses from being satisfied in their jobs included an overwhelming response to high patient volumes, understaffing, and poor retention of experienced nurses. Additional factors were poor pay, lack of support staff and administrative support, high use of agency nurses, poor quality of life, unsafe work environment, poor communication between the emergency department and other departments, and overuse of the emergency department by private physicians. Advanced practice nurses reported specific barriers; lack of role appreciation and specialty certification, legal barriers, lack of power, resistance from staff, and low pay. Facilitators for Ed nurses included: educational and administrative support, supportive staff in the emergency department, good pay, and increased pay for additional certifications and education. Facilitators to ED flow were: visitor control, increased use of a bedside laboratory, and faxing reports to floors when transferring patients. Recommendations: Hospital and ED administrators need to make the retention of their experienced nurses a high priority. Findings from this study reveal several areas that can improve nurse retention in the emergency department. Improving the image of ED nurses, safe staffing, a safe work environment, and certification for advanced practice nurses in their specialty area will help reduce barriers and facilitate job satisfaction for ED nurses. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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