Derivation and Implementation of Nursing Protocols for the Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162857
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Derivation and Implementation of Nursing Protocols for the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Derivation and Implementation of Nursing Protocols for the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Zegzdryn, Cindy, RN, BA, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Alaska Native Medical Center
Title:Cindy Zegzdryn, RN, BA, CEN
Contact Address:P.O. Box 229, Palmer, AK, 99645, USA
Contact Telephone:(907) 729-1717
Co-Authors:Patti Paris, MD and Linda Smith, MD
Purpose: Many patients present to the emergency department (ED) with illness or injury complaints that are amenable to standardization of therapeutics and diagnostics. There is a benefit, both for patient comfort and ED length of stay, for these actions to be initiated as soon as recognized. A set of nursing protocols was developed to: (a) improve patient care by initiating treatment earlier; (b) shorten ED length of stay; (c) standardize care for certain chief complaints; and (d) provide a standard to which individual nurse performance could be evaluated. Setting and Participants: Patients who met inclusion criteria for the nursing protocols were identified by the triage nurse. The approved diagnostics or therapeutics were initiated prior to medical provider evaluation. Methodology: A set of protocols for 14 patient chief complaints was developed. Each protocol had inclusion criteria, a set of actions, and instructions for which staff members were to implement the action. These actions included ordering x-rays and lab tests and administering medications such as acetaminophen and Phenobarbital. ED physicians, nurses, and unit clerks reviewed these protocols and improvements were made. The protocols were reviewed by the medical and nursing boards of the hospital and approved. Protocols were implemented two at a time every two to four weeks. Staff education was done through bulletin boards and instruction sheets placed on the chart of every patient who qualified until satisfactory compliance was achieved. Results: The protocols have become the ED standard of care and compliance is used in nursing evaluations. Though difficult to quantify, the ED staff believes that patient care has improved as comfort measures are initiated rapidly, usually upon presentation to the emergency department. The length of stay in the emergency department has dropped dramatically for patients with alcohol withdrawal and bronchospasm. The length of stay for both of these protocols is determined mainly by nursing interactions. Recommendations: The nursing protocols have improved patient care and improved the flow of the emergency department. Nurses are expected to utilize their evaluation skills and are empowered to act more independently. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDerivation and Implementation of Nursing Protocols for the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162857-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Derivation and Implementation of Nursing Protocols for the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zegzdryn, Cindy, RN, BA, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Alaska Native Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Cindy Zegzdryn, RN, BA, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O. Box 229, Palmer, AK, 99645, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(907) 729-1717</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">czegzdry@anmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patti Paris, MD and Linda Smith, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Many patients present to the emergency department (ED) with illness or injury complaints that are amenable to standardization of therapeutics and diagnostics. There is a benefit, both for patient comfort and ED length of stay, for these actions to be initiated as soon as recognized. A set of nursing protocols was developed to: (a) improve patient care by initiating treatment earlier; (b) shorten ED length of stay; (c) standardize care for certain chief complaints; and (d) provide a standard to which individual nurse performance could be evaluated. Setting and Participants: Patients who met inclusion criteria for the nursing protocols were identified by the triage nurse. The approved diagnostics or therapeutics were initiated prior to medical provider evaluation. Methodology: A set of protocols for 14 patient chief complaints was developed. Each protocol had inclusion criteria, a set of actions, and instructions for which staff members were to implement the action. These actions included ordering x-rays and lab tests and administering medications such as acetaminophen and Phenobarbital. ED physicians, nurses, and unit clerks reviewed these protocols and improvements were made. The protocols were reviewed by the medical and nursing boards of the hospital and approved. Protocols were implemented two at a time every two to four weeks. Staff education was done through bulletin boards and instruction sheets placed on the chart of every patient who qualified until satisfactory compliance was achieved. Results: The protocols have become the ED standard of care and compliance is used in nursing evaluations. Though difficult to quantify, the ED staff believes that patient care has improved as comfort measures are initiated rapidly, usually upon presentation to the emergency department. The length of stay in the emergency department has dropped dramatically for patients with alcohol withdrawal and bronchospasm. The length of stay for both of these protocols is determined mainly by nursing interactions. Recommendations: The nursing protocols have improved patient care and improved the flow of the emergency department. Nurses are expected to utilize their evaluation skills and are empowered to act more independently. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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