Waiting Times for Treatment: Emergency Department Patients' Expectations and Evaluation of Quality of Nursing Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162861
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Waiting Times for Treatment: Emergency Department Patients' Expectations and Evaluation of Quality of Nursing Care
Abstract:
Waiting Times for Treatment: Emergency Department Patients' Expectations and Evaluation of Quality of Nursing Care
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Cockley, Pamela, RN, BSN, CEN, CCRC
P.I. Institution Name:Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh
Contact Telephone:412/232-5827
Co-Authors:Bruce A. MacLeod, MD, FACEP; Laura Browning, PhD; Faye Sinkula Gnoth, RN, PHRN; Gary Pollock, MD; Lorrie Bonocorrsi, RN, BSN; and Lisa Durkin, RN
Purpose: Patient dissatisfaction is often related to long waits associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits. This study examined patients' expectations of waiting time and impact on evaluation of quality of nursing care. Design/Setting: A prospective, descriptive study using survey methodology was conducted in an urban Level I Trauma/Burn Center (annual census 44,000 visits/year). Sample: A convenience sample of ED patients 18 years or older was eligible to participate. The sample included 147 patients with a mean age of 59.6 years (range 18 to 96 years) and with 52% female respondents. The majority had symptoms for < 2 days (56%; n=82), considered their visit an emergency (76%; n=101), and had used emergency services the previous year one time or less (66%; n=98). Methodology: During random time blocks (05/02-09/02), eligible patients were asked to complete an anonymous written survey designed by the investigators concerning waiting time and quality of clinical care. Waiting time was defined as time from registration until placement in a treatment room. Quality of care was rated on a 5-point Likert scale. Patients were asked to list suggestions to improve waiting time. Descriptive statistics and Chi Square were used for data analysis. Results: Overall, patients expected to wait for treatment between 0 to 120 minutes (mean=36 minutes); 92% (n=121) expected to wait less than 60 minutes. Only 10 patients (8%) thought waiting two hours for treatment was acceptable. Of those patients waiting less than expected (n=53; 34 minute average expected wait time), 93% rated overall nursing care very good to excellent. Of those waiting the expected amount of time (n=53; 38 minute average expected wait time), 91% rated overall nursing care as very good to excellent. Of those waiting longer than expected (n=28; 33 minute average expected wait time), 85% rated overall nursing care as very good to excellent. There were no statistically significant differences between groups concerning waiting time expectations and quality of nursing care ratings (p>.10). Improvement of the environment (e.g. providing reading materials) was identified by patients (34%; n=25) as the best way to improve waiting time, followed by reduction or explanation of wait time (23%; n=17). Conclusions: Patients have many expectations that ED nurses can address or modify to improve waiting time. Patients tended to rate nursing care highest when they waited less than or equal to what they expected. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWaiting Times for Treatment: Emergency Department Patients' Expectations and Evaluation of Quality of Nursing Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162861-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Waiting Times for Treatment: Emergency Department Patients' Expectations and Evaluation of Quality of Nursing Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cockley, Pamela, RN, BSN, CEN, CCRC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">412/232-5827</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pcockley@mercy.pmhs.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bruce A. MacLeod, MD, FACEP; Laura Browning, PhD; Faye Sinkula Gnoth, RN, PHRN; Gary Pollock, MD; Lorrie Bonocorrsi, RN, BSN; and Lisa Durkin, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Patient dissatisfaction is often related to long waits associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits. This study examined patients' expectations of waiting time and impact on evaluation of quality of nursing care. Design/Setting: A prospective, descriptive study using survey methodology was conducted in an urban Level I Trauma/Burn Center (annual census 44,000 visits/year). Sample: A convenience sample of ED patients 18 years or older was eligible to participate. The sample included 147 patients with a mean age of 59.6 years (range 18 to 96 years) and with 52% female respondents. The majority had symptoms for &lt; 2 days (56%; n=82), considered their visit an emergency (76%; n=101), and had used emergency services the previous year one time or less (66%; n=98). Methodology: During random time blocks (05/02-09/02), eligible patients were asked to complete an anonymous written survey designed by the investigators concerning waiting time and quality of clinical care. Waiting time was defined as time from registration until placement in a treatment room. Quality of care was rated on a 5-point Likert scale. Patients were asked to list suggestions to improve waiting time. Descriptive statistics and Chi Square were used for data analysis. Results: Overall, patients expected to wait for treatment between 0 to 120 minutes (mean=36 minutes); 92% (n=121) expected to wait less than 60 minutes. Only 10 patients (8%) thought waiting two hours for treatment was acceptable. Of those patients waiting less than expected (n=53; 34 minute average expected wait time), 93% rated overall nursing care very good to excellent. Of those waiting the expected amount of time (n=53; 38 minute average expected wait time), 91% rated overall nursing care as very good to excellent. Of those waiting longer than expected (n=28; 33 minute average expected wait time), 85% rated overall nursing care as very good to excellent. There were no statistically significant differences between groups concerning waiting time expectations and quality of nursing care ratings (p&gt;.10). Improvement of the environment (e.g. providing reading materials) was identified by patients (34%; n=25) as the best way to improve waiting time, followed by reduction or explanation of wait time (23%; n=17). Conclusions: Patients have many expectations that ED nurses can address or modify to improve waiting time. Patients tended to rate nursing care highest when they waited less than or equal to what they expected. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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